Prince ( @prince ) Instagram Profile

prince

Prince

Official Account | Celebrating the Life & Legacy of Prince.
PRINCESTAGRAM archived forever @PRNlegacy

  • 62 posts
  • 60k followers
  • 1 following

Prince Profile Information

  • Jill Jones met Prince in 1980 on the Dirty Mind Tour, when she was singing backing vocals for his opening act, Teena Marie. By 1982 both a romantic and creative relationship had developed between the two artists, and Jill was logging countless hours alongside Prince at the historic Sunset Sound studio in Los Angeles. 🔸
In addition to singing background vocals on songs that Prince would release under his own name, Jill would also contribute to the tracks that Prince was creating for proteges like The Time, Apollonia 6, and Sheila E. 🔸
In an interview with the New York Times, Jill recalled always being prepared to record, whether it was the middle of the afternoon or 3:00 a.m. “Before cellphones, somehow he found us,” she said. “You’d go straight to the studio.” 🔸
Of all the artists that Prince would collaborate with during this prolific era of his career, Jill Jones’ presence was among the most consistent. Her voice can be heard on some of Prince’s biggest hits, including “1999,” and in the background of countless other songs, where she provided a backbone for the melody as a supporting vocalist. 🔸
It’s no wonder, then, that Jill Jones appears three times on the new Prince album Originals: in addition to singing the backing vocals on “Baby, You’re a Trip,” which would later appear on the 1987 solo album she made with Prince for his Paisley Park Records imprint, she can also be heard on Prince’s recordings of “Jungle Love” and “Manic Monday.” 🔸
“You didn’t really know Prince unless you had been in the studio with him,” Jill told the New York Times. "Those were the best years: living, breathing, eating music.”
  • Jill Jones met Prince in 1980 on the Dirty Mind Tour, when she was singing backing vocals for his opening act, Teena Marie. By 1982 both a romantic and creative relationship had developed between the two artists, and Jill was logging countless hours alongside Prince at the historic Sunset Sound studio in Los Angeles. 🔸
    In addition to singing background vocals on songs that Prince would release under his own name, Jill would also contribute to the tracks that Prince was creating for proteges like The Time, Apollonia 6, and Sheila E. 🔸
    In an interview with the New York Times, Jill recalled always being prepared to record, whether it was the middle of the afternoon or 3:00 a.m. “Before cellphones, somehow he found us,” she said. “You’d go straight to the studio.” 🔸
    Of all the artists that Prince would collaborate with during this prolific era of his career, Jill Jones’ presence was among the most consistent. Her voice can be heard on some of Prince’s biggest hits, including “1999,” and in the background of countless other songs, where she provided a backbone for the melody as a supporting vocalist. 🔸
    It’s no wonder, then, that Jill Jones appears three times on the new Prince album Originals: in addition to singing the backing vocals on “Baby, You’re a Trip,” which would later appear on the 1987 solo album she made with Prince for his Paisley Park Records imprint, she can also be heard on Prince’s recordings of “Jungle Love” and “Manic Monday.” 🔸
    “You didn’t really know Prince unless you had been in the studio with him,” Jill told the New York Times. "Those were the best years: living, breathing, eating music.”
  •  2,304  27  21 June, 2019
  • By 1981, Prince was writing and recording more music than he could possibly release under his own name. At the same time, his creative impulses were pulling him in several different directions, to the point that he had evolved several different personas in the studio. 🔸

One of Prince's first spin-off projects was The Time, which was centered around his high school friend and bandmate, Morris Day, and several musicians from their North Minneapolis neighborhood. Prince and Morris had cut their teeth together in the band Grand Central, playing school dances and Battle of the Bands showcases alongside rivals like Flyte Tyme, a band led by Terry Lewis. 🔸

Before a live band had even been assembled, Prince began writing hard-driving funk songs and working up a concept for a band that would allow him to play up his North Side influences. "What we were trying to do — and Prince was masterminding the whole situation — was come up with a name and sayings that you'd have to say every day," Morris Day recalled in a 2011 documentary. '"He came up with 'the Time,' which I thought was pretty clever." 🔸

The Time combined members of Flyte Tyme with Morris and the guitarist Jesse Johnson, who had just arrived in town from Illinois. The band was photographed for the cover of The Time's debut album, The Time, and the songs were credited to Morris Day and producer Jamie Starr. But despite Morris's insistence in interviews that Jamie Starr was a real, separate person, the album had been almost entirely recorded by Prince alone. 🔸 "It was Morris playing drums and me on the bass. That’s how we would make the basic track. Naked,” Prince told Ebony in 2015. “Just like that, and nobody would know. And then when you put the keys on it and the guitar, then that’s what the Time was. And it was perfect.” 🔸

One of the tracks on the new Originals album, "Gigolos Get Lonely Too," captures Prince in that naked state, diving deep for an emotional ballad. Another track, the hit he co-wrote with Morris and Jesse Johnson, "Jungle Love," captures a candid laugh and playful vocal delivery from Prince as he offers a guide for Morris Day to use while adding his voice to the song.🔸
  • By 1981, Prince was writing and recording more music than he could possibly release under his own name. At the same time, his creative impulses were pulling him in several different directions, to the point that he had evolved several different personas in the studio. 🔸

    One of Prince's first spin-off projects was The Time, which was centered around his high school friend and bandmate, Morris Day, and several musicians from their North Minneapolis neighborhood. Prince and Morris had cut their teeth together in the band Grand Central, playing school dances and Battle of the Bands showcases alongside rivals like Flyte Tyme, a band led by Terry Lewis. 🔸

    Before a live band had even been assembled, Prince began writing hard-driving funk songs and working up a concept for a band that would allow him to play up his North Side influences. "What we were trying to do — and Prince was masterminding the whole situation — was come up with a name and sayings that you'd have to say every day," Morris Day recalled in a 2011 documentary. '"He came up with 'the Time,' which I thought was pretty clever." 🔸

    The Time combined members of Flyte Tyme with Morris and the guitarist Jesse Johnson, who had just arrived in town from Illinois. The band was photographed for the cover of The Time's debut album, The Time, and the songs were credited to Morris Day and producer Jamie Starr. But despite Morris's insistence in interviews that Jamie Starr was a real, separate person, the album had been almost entirely recorded by Prince alone. 🔸 "It was Morris playing drums and me on the bass. That’s how we would make the basic track. Naked,” Prince told Ebony in 2015. “Just like that, and nobody would know. And then when you put the keys on it and the guitar, then that’s what the Time was. And it was perfect.” 🔸

    One of the tracks on the new Originals album, "Gigolos Get Lonely Too," captures Prince in that naked state, diving deep for an emotional ballad. Another track, the hit he co-wrote with Morris and Jesse Johnson, "Jungle Love," captures a candid laugh and playful vocal delivery from Prince as he offers a guide for Morris Day to use while adding his voice to the song.🔸
  •  3,252  46  21 June, 2019
  • Of the many people Prince worked with during the pivotal era of his early-1980s career, few had the opportunity to watch his creative process unfold as closely as the engineer Peggy McCreary, who worked alongside Prince in the studio beginning in 1981.

Beginning with the Controversy album, Peggy was Prince's engineer when he was in Los Angeles to record at the historic Sunset Sound studio. In addition to the material he released under his own name, Peggy was there as Prince laid down tracks for countless other artists, from proteges like Vanity 6, The Time, and Apollonia 6 to those outside his immediate orbit like @officialthebangles.

In that prolific era, Prince was often tracking multiple songs in a day, scribbling lyrics on the back of envelopes or napkins as the songs poured out of him. "These songs were a snapshot of what he was thinking and feeling on that day in the studio. You can hear if he was in love, if he was hurt, or if he was lonely in every phrase because it was just him," Peggy writes in the liner notes for Originals, a new album of Prince's original recordings of the songs he gave to other people.

Hear some of the mesmerizing performances Peggy captured with Prince in the studio — including his original takes of "Manic Monday" (later released by the Bangles), "Noon Rendezvous" (for @sheilaedrummer), "Jungle Love," and the stunning "Gigolos Get Lonely Too" (both for The Time) — and read more of her thoughts on her time with Prince in the liner notes for Originals, which will be released worldwide by @warnerrecords on June 21.
  • Of the many people Prince worked with during the pivotal era of his early-1980s career, few had the opportunity to watch his creative process unfold as closely as the engineer Peggy McCreary, who worked alongside Prince in the studio beginning in 1981.

    Beginning with the Controversy album, Peggy was Prince's engineer when he was in Los Angeles to record at the historic Sunset Sound studio. In addition to the material he released under his own name, Peggy was there as Prince laid down tracks for countless other artists, from proteges like Vanity 6, The Time, and Apollonia 6 to those outside his immediate orbit like @officialthebangles.

    In that prolific era, Prince was often tracking multiple songs in a day, scribbling lyrics on the back of envelopes or napkins as the songs poured out of him. "These songs were a snapshot of what he was thinking and feeling on that day in the studio. You can hear if he was in love, if he was hurt, or if he was lonely in every phrase because it was just him," Peggy writes in the liner notes for Originals, a new album of Prince's original recordings of the songs he gave to other people.

    Hear some of the mesmerizing performances Peggy captured with Prince in the studio — including his original takes of "Manic Monday" (later released by the Bangles), "Noon Rendezvous" (for @sheilaedrummer), "Jungle Love," and the stunning "Gigolos Get Lonely Too" (both for The Time) — and read more of her thoughts on her time with Prince in the liner notes for Originals, which will be released worldwide by @warnerrecords on June 21.
  •  2,211  24  20 June, 2019
  • Prince was constantly toying with the public's perceptions of his sexuality, upbringing, and cultural identity. This shape-shifting wasn’t just happening on stage; behind the scenes, he was also adopting various pseudonyms that allowed him to explore different facets of his creative persona.

Beginning with 2 of his first proteges, the Time and Vanity 6, in the early 1980s, Prince would leave his own name out of the liner notes and credit the albums to Jamie Starr or the Starr Company. The sleight-of-hand worked so well that when the Time released their first 2 albums in 1981 and 1982 — which were almost exclusively written and recorded by Prince — the general public had no idea he was involved. “Jamie Starr is an engineer,” @morris_day_and_the_time  told @rollingstone in 1983.

A 1984 single for Sheena Easton, “Sugar Walls,” was credited to Alexander Nevermind, while the @officialthebangles breakout “Manic Monday” was attributed to Christopher, a name that played on Prince's character in the film Under the Cherry Moon. Each name seemed to give Prince permission to explore a different side of his personality, from the grittier vibe of the Time with Jamie Starr to the country-leaning Joey Coco to the gender fluid falsetto of his alter-ego, Camille.

In the 1980s, the music industry was still deeply segregated along racial lines. Even though Prince’s music transcended genre and combined everything from R&B, funk, and gospel to punk and pop, his singles were relegated to the R&B charts for much of his early career. Using different pseudonyms forced the industry to hear his work based on its merit and made it possible for his different identities to chart simultaneously. “I was just getting tired of seeing my name,” the artist told Bass Player Magazine. For Prince, music was the primary focus of his life, and everything else was secondary - including his own identity. “If you give away an idea, you still own that idea,” he continued. "In fact, giving it away strengthens it.” Hear original recordings of the songs Prince wrote as Joey Coco and more on the new collection Originals, now streaming on @tidal and will be released June 21 by @warnerrecords.
  • Prince was constantly toying with the public's perceptions of his sexuality, upbringing, and cultural identity. This shape-shifting wasn’t just happening on stage; behind the scenes, he was also adopting various pseudonyms that allowed him to explore different facets of his creative persona.

    Beginning with 2 of his first proteges, the Time and Vanity 6, in the early 1980s, Prince would leave his own name out of the liner notes and credit the albums to Jamie Starr or the Starr Company. The sleight-of-hand worked so well that when the Time released their first 2 albums in 1981 and 1982 — which were almost exclusively written and recorded by Prince — the general public had no idea he was involved. “Jamie Starr is an engineer,” @morris_day_and_the_time told @rollingstone in 1983.

    A 1984 single for Sheena Easton, “Sugar Walls,” was credited to Alexander Nevermind, while the @officialthebangles breakout “Manic Monday” was attributed to Christopher, a name that played on Prince's character in the film Under the Cherry Moon. Each name seemed to give Prince permission to explore a different side of his personality, from the grittier vibe of the Time with Jamie Starr to the country-leaning Joey Coco to the gender fluid falsetto of his alter-ego, Camille.

    In the 1980s, the music industry was still deeply segregated along racial lines. Even though Prince’s music transcended genre and combined everything from R&B, funk, and gospel to punk and pop, his singles were relegated to the R&B charts for much of his early career. Using different pseudonyms forced the industry to hear his work based on its merit and made it possible for his different identities to chart simultaneously. “I was just getting tired of seeing my name,” the artist told Bass Player Magazine. For Prince, music was the primary focus of his life, and everything else was secondary - including his own identity. “If you give away an idea, you still own that idea,” he continued. "In fact, giving it away strengthens it.” Hear original recordings of the songs Prince wrote as Joey Coco and more on the new collection Originals, now streaming on @tidal and will be released June 21 by @warnerrecords.
  •  8,478  104  19 June, 2019
  • In early 1984, Prince was on the cusp of global fame and working at an extraordinary pace.

Just months before releasing his watershed soundtrack and film, Purple Rain, Prince was deep into preparations for his massive Purple Rain Tour while also writing and recording nearly a song a day for artists like @sheilaedrummer, The Time, and The Family.

One of those songs, “Manic Monday,” was recorded in February 1984 and was originally intended for the group Apollonia 6, who would be introduced to the world that summer in the film Purple Rain. But before their debut album was complete, he decided to pull "Manic Monday" from the Apollonia 6 album and give it to another up-and-coming band instead. @officialthebangles were part of a new movement of Los Angeles musicians dubbed "The Paisley Underground" who were bridging the synth beats of the '80s with psychedelic '60s influences, and Prince was a fan of their songs. "I knew it was an incredible gift," the Bangles' lead singer @susannahoffsofficial told the @nytimes, remembering back to the day she picked up the cassette of "Manic Monday" from Sunset Sound. "It was like putting on the slipper in a fairy tale." Using Prince's recording as a guide, the Bangles put their own spin on "Manic Monday," rearranging a bridge and adapting it to suit their sound. Their version of "Manic Monday" was included on their album Different Light and became their first breakout hit, skyrocketing to the top of the Billboard Hot 100. It peaked at the number 2 spot, just behind Prince's own hit single "Kiss." All these years later, however, Hoffs and her Bangles band mates remember how entranced they were when they first heard Prince's original rendition of the song. For over 30 years, they were some of the only people in the world to have heard it — until this month. Prince's rendition of "Manic Monday" is one of the 15 tracks on the new album Originals, a collection of Prince's versions of the hit songs he gave to other artists. The album is streaming exclusively on @tidal now, and will be released worldwide by @warnerrecords on June 21.
  • In early 1984, Prince was on the cusp of global fame and working at an extraordinary pace.

    Just months before releasing his watershed soundtrack and film, Purple Rain, Prince was deep into preparations for his massive Purple Rain Tour while also writing and recording nearly a song a day for artists like @sheilaedrummer, The Time, and The Family.

    One of those songs, “Manic Monday,” was recorded in February 1984 and was originally intended for the group Apollonia 6, who would be introduced to the world that summer in the film Purple Rain. But before their debut album was complete, he decided to pull "Manic Monday" from the Apollonia 6 album and give it to another up-and-coming band instead. @officialthebangles were part of a new movement of Los Angeles musicians dubbed "The Paisley Underground" who were bridging the synth beats of the '80s with psychedelic '60s influences, and Prince was a fan of their songs. "I knew it was an incredible gift," the Bangles' lead singer @susannahoffsofficial told the @nytimes, remembering back to the day she picked up the cassette of "Manic Monday" from Sunset Sound. "It was like putting on the slipper in a fairy tale." Using Prince's recording as a guide, the Bangles put their own spin on "Manic Monday," rearranging a bridge and adapting it to suit their sound. Their version of "Manic Monday" was included on their album Different Light and became their first breakout hit, skyrocketing to the top of the Billboard Hot 100. It peaked at the number 2 spot, just behind Prince's own hit single "Kiss." All these years later, however, Hoffs and her Bangles band mates remember how entranced they were when they first heard Prince's original rendition of the song. For over 30 years, they were some of the only people in the world to have heard it — until this month. Prince's rendition of "Manic Monday" is one of the 15 tracks on the new album Originals, a collection of Prince's versions of the hit songs he gave to other artists. The album is streaming exclusively on @tidal now, and will be released worldwide by @warnerrecords on June 21.
  •  2,420  39  18 June, 2019
  • Of the many surprises included on the new Prince release Originals, “You’re My Love” stands out to listeners for several reasons. First, it’s one of the only unreleased recordings on the album that captures Prince singing in a lower register, crooning his way through the soft ballad. And second, it’s one of the only songs from the collection that Prince gave to an artist he wasn’t immediately connected with; rather than pass the song along to one of his proteges, Prince gave “You’re My Love” to the country icon @_kennyrogers.🔸
Writing under the name Joey Coco, Prince seemed to tap into an entirely new persona with “You’re My Love.” It’s a straightforward love song, and its lyrics sound relatively tame in comparison to the sexually charged pop hits that Prince was cranking out in 1982, when he recorded his version of “You’re My Love” at his Kiowa Trail home studio in Chanhassen, Minnesota. 🔸
Rather than use any of Prince’s instrumentation, Kenny Rogers would end up completely recording the track for his 1986 album They Don’t Make Them Like They Used To, even changing the key to suit Rogers’ voice. But Rogers treasured the fact that the original recording featured him singing and playing all of the instruments. 🔸
“It was such an incredible thing that Prince took the time to do that for me,” Rogers shared in 2017. “He was a brilliant guy and a gifted musician with a lot of feelings, and you could tell his feelings went far deeper than what was written on his face.” 🔸
Prince’s original rendition of “You’re My Love” has remained locked in his legendary vault of unreleased recordings until now. Hear it on the new collection Originals, alongside Prince’s versions of other iconic songs he gave away like “Manic Monday,” “Jungle Love” and “The Glamorous Life.” Originals is streaming exclusively on @tidal now, and will be released worldwide on June 21 by @warnerrecords.
  • Of the many surprises included on the new Prince release Originals, “You’re My Love” stands out to listeners for several reasons. First, it’s one of the only unreleased recordings on the album that captures Prince singing in a lower register, crooning his way through the soft ballad. And second, it’s one of the only songs from the collection that Prince gave to an artist he wasn’t immediately connected with; rather than pass the song along to one of his proteges, Prince gave “You’re My Love” to the country icon @_kennyrogers.🔸
    Writing under the name Joey Coco, Prince seemed to tap into an entirely new persona with “You’re My Love.” It’s a straightforward love song, and its lyrics sound relatively tame in comparison to the sexually charged pop hits that Prince was cranking out in 1982, when he recorded his version of “You’re My Love” at his Kiowa Trail home studio in Chanhassen, Minnesota. 🔸
    Rather than use any of Prince’s instrumentation, Kenny Rogers would end up completely recording the track for his 1986 album They Don’t Make Them Like They Used To, even changing the key to suit Rogers’ voice. But Rogers treasured the fact that the original recording featured him singing and playing all of the instruments. 🔸
    “It was such an incredible thing that Prince took the time to do that for me,” Rogers shared in 2017. “He was a brilliant guy and a gifted musician with a lot of feelings, and you could tell his feelings went far deeper than what was written on his face.” 🔸
    Prince’s original rendition of “You’re My Love” has remained locked in his legendary vault of unreleased recordings until now. Hear it on the new collection Originals, alongside Prince’s versions of other iconic songs he gave away like “Manic Monday,” “Jungle Love” and “The Glamorous Life.” Originals is streaming exclusively on @tidal now, and will be released worldwide on June 21 by @warnerrecords.
  •  2,645  30  14 June, 2019
  • In the summer of 1984, Prince was creating new work at an incomprehensible pace. In the span of just two months he released the soundtrack and film, Purple Rain, hit albums from @sheilaedrummer and the Time, and was already halfway through recording his next album, Around the World in a Day.
✨
In June and July 1984, just as the world was waking up to the genius of his artistry, he was busy forming yet another side project: The Family, a band led by @stpaulpeterson of the Time and Prince’s romantic interest and muse, @susannahmelvoin. ✨
“He got pleasure out of his own ability to create in an instant,” Susannah told the New York Times. “The endorphin came from allowing the spigot to be constantly running.” ✨
One of those songs was “Nothing Compares 2 U,” which would become a global hit for @oconnor.sinead in 1990 but was originally given to the Family in 1984. Engineer Susan Rogers, who captured Prince’s initial recording of the song, says the lyrics dug into his intense feelings for Susannah, and were also informed by his sadness over the departure of a young woman who worked for him. ✨
“His young housekeeper, Sandy Scipioni, had to leave suddenly to be with her family because her father died of a heart attack,” Susan told the @guardian. “He kept asking, ‘When’s Sandy coming back?’” Prince wrote the song in under an hour, and laid down most of the parts himself. Susannah sang backing vocals, and the saxophonist Eric Leeds added an additional solo. And then Prince handed off the song to his new side project, carefully instructing St. Paul to copy his melody and emotional delivery note for note. ✨
“These songs are like his children – he would say that very often,” Susannah told @nytimes. “He was the ultimate social worker.” Prince’s first 1984 recording of “Nothing Compares 2 U” is included on the new album Originals, which is streaming exclusively on @tidal. In addition to “Nothing Compares 2 U,” the album includes 14 never-before-heard original recordings of the songs Prince gave to other artists. It will be released by @warnerrecords June 21, with a vinyl release to follow July 19.
  • In the summer of 1984, Prince was creating new work at an incomprehensible pace. In the span of just two months he released the soundtrack and film, Purple Rain, hit albums from @sheilaedrummer and the Time, and was already halfway through recording his next album, Around the World in a Day.

    In June and July 1984, just as the world was waking up to the genius of his artistry, he was busy forming yet another side project: The Family, a band led by @stpaulpeterson of the Time and Prince’s romantic interest and muse, @susannahmelvoin. ✨
    “He got pleasure out of his own ability to create in an instant,” Susannah told the New York Times. “The endorphin came from allowing the spigot to be constantly running.” ✨
    One of those songs was “Nothing Compares 2 U,” which would become a global hit for @oconnor.sinead in 1990 but was originally given to the Family in 1984. Engineer Susan Rogers, who captured Prince’s initial recording of the song, says the lyrics dug into his intense feelings for Susannah, and were also informed by his sadness over the departure of a young woman who worked for him. ✨
    “His young housekeeper, Sandy Scipioni, had to leave suddenly to be with her family because her father died of a heart attack,” Susan told the @guardian. “He kept asking, ‘When’s Sandy coming back?’” Prince wrote the song in under an hour, and laid down most of the parts himself. Susannah sang backing vocals, and the saxophonist Eric Leeds added an additional solo. And then Prince handed off the song to his new side project, carefully instructing St. Paul to copy his melody and emotional delivery note for note. ✨
    “These songs are like his children – he would say that very often,” Susannah told @nytimes. “He was the ultimate social worker.” Prince’s first 1984 recording of “Nothing Compares 2 U” is included on the new album Originals, which is streaming exclusively on @tidal. In addition to “Nothing Compares 2 U,” the album includes 14 never-before-heard original recordings of the songs Prince gave to other artists. It will be released by @warnerrecords June 21, with a vinyl release to follow July 19.
  •  3,153  53  13 June, 2019
  • The new Prince album Originals is available to stream now exclusively on @TIDAL, with a wider release coming June 21st via @WarnerRecords.

A 15-track album featuring 14 previously unreleased recordings that illuminate the vital role Prince played in other artists’ careers, Originals includes Prince's foundational recordings of hit songs like "Manic Monday," "The Glamorous Life," "Jungle Love," and more. “Prince led the way, for artistic freedom, for ownership. He’s one of the bravest people I can think of in the industry," Jay-Z told the New York Times.

#PrinceOriginals
  • The new Prince album Originals is available to stream now exclusively on @TIDAL, with a wider release coming June 21st via @WarnerRecords.

    A 15-track album featuring 14 previously unreleased recordings that illuminate the vital role Prince played in other artists’ careers, Originals includes Prince's foundational recordings of hit songs like "Manic Monday," "The Glamorous Life," "Jungle Love," and more. “Prince led the way, for artistic freedom, for ownership. He’s one of the bravest people I can think of in the industry," Jay-Z told the New York Times.

    #PrinceOriginals
  •  8,650  153  7 June, 2019
  • On June 7, 1958, the musical genius and creative visionary Prince Rogers Nelson was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Although he marked the occasion early in his career — including an epic party with the Revolution at @firstavenue on June 7, 1984, and Celebrations at @officialpaisleypark in the early 2000s — he moved away from celebrating birthdays or anniversaries later in life. "I don't celebrate birthdays, so that stops me from counting days, which stops me from counting time," he told the Dutch television program TROS in 1999, sliding his sunglasses down. "Which allows me to still look the same as I did 10 years ago!" #nothingcompares2u
  • On June 7, 1958, the musical genius and creative visionary Prince Rogers Nelson was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Although he marked the occasion early in his career — including an epic party with the Revolution at @firstavenue on June 7, 1984, and Celebrations at @officialpaisleypark in the early 2000s — he moved away from celebrating birthdays or anniversaries later in life. "I don't celebrate birthdays, so that stops me from counting days, which stops me from counting time," he told the Dutch television program TROS in 1999, sliding his sunglasses down. "Which allows me to still look the same as I did 10 years ago!" #nothingcompares2u
  •  14,762  397  7 June, 2019
  • This Saturday, PBS viewers across the U.S. will have the opportunity to watch Prince In Concert: Rave Un2 the Year 2000, his historic turn-of-the-millennium New Year's Eve party held at @officialpaisleypark Park. 
Originally broadcast as an In Demand Pay-Per-View concert, Rave Un2 the Year 2000 featured special guests like @maceoparker, Larry Graham, George Clinton & the Parliament Funkadelics!!, and @lennykravitz performing with Prince in the soundstage at Paisley Park.
  • This Saturday, PBS viewers across the U.S. will have the opportunity to watch Prince In Concert: Rave Un2 the Year 2000, his historic turn-of-the-millennium New Year's Eve party held at @officialpaisleypark Park.
    Originally broadcast as an In Demand Pay-Per-View concert, Rave Un2 the Year 2000 featured special guests like @maceoparker, Larry Graham, George Clinton & the Parliament Funkadelics!!, and @lennykravitz performing with Prince in the soundstage at Paisley Park.
  •  7,730  318  31 May, 2019
  • Prince’s fascination with James Brown began at a very early age. On November 29, 1969, when Prince was just 11 years old, he had the opportunity to see James Brown and his Famous Flames perform live at the @armorymn in downtown Minneapolis. Prince was brought to the show by his stepfather, Hayward Baker, and at one point during the performance Hayward lifted Prince up onto the stage to dance with the band, giving the budding young artist an up-close view of the funk icon in action.
🔸
James Brown’s dramatic, energetic performance style clearly inspired Prince, and elements of his stage show are represented in the way Prince danced, teased his audience, and commanded his band. Musically, the propulsive momentum of Brown’s style of funk courses through much of Prince’s music, and his work can be heard as samples in songs like “Gett Off” (which includes a snippet of “Mother Popcorn”) and “Gangster Glam” (which incorporates the drum fill from “Funky Drummer”). 🔸
Throughout his career, Prince would incorporate covers of James Brown songs like “Get Up (I Feel Like Being) A Sex Machine” into his live sets, and in the late ‘90s he would have the opportunity to collaborate with James Brown’s saxophonist, @maceoparker, who toured with Prince’s band in the early 2000s and appeared on albums like Rave Un2 the Joy Fantastic, Musicology, and 3121.
  • Prince’s fascination with James Brown began at a very early age. On November 29, 1969, when Prince was just 11 years old, he had the opportunity to see James Brown and his Famous Flames perform live at the @armorymn in downtown Minneapolis. Prince was brought to the show by his stepfather, Hayward Baker, and at one point during the performance Hayward lifted Prince up onto the stage to dance with the band, giving the budding young artist an up-close view of the funk icon in action.
    🔸
    James Brown’s dramatic, energetic performance style clearly inspired Prince, and elements of his stage show are represented in the way Prince danced, teased his audience, and commanded his band. Musically, the propulsive momentum of Brown’s style of funk courses through much of Prince’s music, and his work can be heard as samples in songs like “Gett Off” (which includes a snippet of “Mother Popcorn”) and “Gangster Glam” (which incorporates the drum fill from “Funky Drummer”). 🔸
    Throughout his career, Prince would incorporate covers of James Brown songs like “Get Up (I Feel Like Being) A Sex Machine” into his live sets, and in the late ‘90s he would have the opportunity to collaborate with James Brown’s saxophonist, @maceoparker, who toured with Prince’s band in the early 2000s and appeared on albums like Rave Un2 the Joy Fantastic, Musicology, and 3121.
  •  11,216  154  18 hours ago
  • When Prince Rogers Nelson was born on June 7, 1958, he was named after his father, John Lewis Nelson's stage name, Prince Rogers. But John wasn't the only musician in the family — Prince's mother, Mattie Della Shaw, also briefly sang in the Prince Rogers Trio. 
It was music that first united John and Mattie, who met at a jazz club in North Minneapolis, the Blue Note. Their relationship began when John recruited Mattie to sing in his band, the Prince Rogers Trio, who would often play clubs on the North Side. 
Mattie went on to earn a master's degree in social work from the @umntwincities, and for over two decades she was a social worker for Minneapolis Public Schools, helping students at Edison, Franklin, Harrison, and other Minneapolis schools. 
She also supported Prince in his musical endeavors, and could be seen attending his events in Minneapolis. Mattie was interviewed by the Minneapolis @startribune back in 1984 — the year that Prince released his breakthrough film and soundtrack, Purple Rain — and shared sweet memories of Prince being drawn to music as a young child. “He could hear music even from a very early age. When he was 3 or 4, we'd go to the department store and he'd jump on the radio, the organ, any type of instrument there was." She attended the Purple Rain premiere in Hollywood in addition to numerous other events. 
In September 1988, she was spotted attending one of the first public afterparties ever at @officialpaisleypark, which got started around 2:00 a.m. in the parking lot outside Prince's studios. "This is his best concert ever," she gushed to the newspaper.

Photo Credit: Tyka Nelson
  • When Prince Rogers Nelson was born on June 7, 1958, he was named after his father, John Lewis Nelson's stage name, Prince Rogers. But John wasn't the only musician in the family — Prince's mother, Mattie Della Shaw, also briefly sang in the Prince Rogers Trio.
    It was music that first united John and Mattie, who met at a jazz club in North Minneapolis, the Blue Note. Their relationship began when John recruited Mattie to sing in his band, the Prince Rogers Trio, who would often play clubs on the North Side.
    Mattie went on to earn a master's degree in social work from the @umntwincities, and for over two decades she was a social worker for Minneapolis Public Schools, helping students at Edison, Franklin, Harrison, and other Minneapolis schools.
    She also supported Prince in his musical endeavors, and could be seen attending his events in Minneapolis. Mattie was interviewed by the Minneapolis @startribune back in 1984 — the year that Prince released his breakthrough film and soundtrack, Purple Rain — and shared sweet memories of Prince being drawn to music as a young child. “He could hear music even from a very early age. When he was 3 or 4, we'd go to the department store and he'd jump on the radio, the organ, any type of instrument there was." She attended the Purple Rain premiere in Hollywood in addition to numerous other events.
    In September 1988, she was spotted attending one of the first public afterparties ever at @officialpaisleypark, which got started around 2:00 a.m. in the parking lot outside Prince's studios. "This is his best concert ever," she gushed to the newspaper.

    Photo Credit: Tyka Nelson
  •  6,957  90  12 May, 2019