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  • “I’ve had precious few moments,” admitted the novelist James Ellroy, “where I’ve said to myself: ‘Ellroy, you are the king. You’re the greatest crime writer that ever lived.’” Ellroy had a childhood that sounds like a crime novel itself. His mother was murdered when he was 10, and her killer was never found. He spent two and a half years breaking into houses just to look around, maybe steal five dollars. His father's last words to him were, “Try to pick up every waitress who serves you.” When he began writing crime novels, Ellroy’s morally complex, sprawling and highly stylized novels like “The Black Dahlia” and “L.A. Confidential” were lauded as part of an intense body of work — but he’s not taking that as an invitation to coast. Visit the link in our bio to read more from @nytmag. @mamadivisuals took this photo.
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    “I’ve had precious few moments,” admitted the novelist James Ellroy, “where I’ve said to myself: ‘Ellroy, you are the king. You’re the greatest crime writer that ever lived.’” Ellroy had a childhood that sounds like a crime novel itself. His mother was murdered when he was 10, and her killer was never found. He spent two and a half years breaking into houses just to look around, maybe steal five dollars. His father's last words to him were, “Try to pick up every waitress who serves you.” When he began writing crime novels, Ellroy’s morally complex, sprawling and highly stylized novels like “The Black Dahlia” and “L.A. Confidential” were lauded as part of an intense body of work — but he’s not taking that as an invitation to coast. Visit the link in our bio to read more from @nytmag. @mamadivisuals took this photo.

  •  6,165  0  5 hours ago
  • The bright charm of “Elite Syncopations," a sweet dance concoction set to ragtime music, lit up the stage at the Joyce Theater’s ballet festival earlier this month. Romany Pajdak and Sarah Lamb of the Royal Ballet performed in the divertissement by Kenneth MacMillan dressed in lavish costumes. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @andrea_mohin took this photo.
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    The bright charm of “Elite Syncopations," a sweet dance concoction set to ragtime music, lit up the stage at the Joyce Theater’s ballet festival earlier this month. Romany Pajdak and Sarah Lamb of the Royal Ballet performed in the divertissement by Kenneth MacMillan dressed in lavish costumes. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @andrea_mohin took this photo.

  •  12,058  0  21 hours ago
  • For those of you on the fence in the #chickensandwichwars, this low-fuss recipe is a respite from the drama. This fried chicken sandwich is best enjoyed immediately, with your favorite hot sauce and a pile of napkins. There's pickle juice in the brine, chopped pickles in the coleslaw and, naturally, some pickles on top, perfectly complementing the buttermilk-battered crispy chicken thighs. Visit the link in our bio to get @alexaweibel's recipe from @nytcooking, or tag a friend who would love it. 🐔 @linda.xiao took this photo, with food styling by @bwashbu.
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    For those of you on the fence in the #chickensandwichwars, this low-fuss recipe is a respite from the drama. This fried chicken sandwich is best enjoyed immediately, with your favorite hot sauce and a pile of napkins. There's pickle juice in the brine, chopped pickles in the coleslaw and, naturally, some pickles on top, perfectly complementing the buttermilk-battered crispy chicken thighs. Visit the link in our bio to get @alexaweibel's recipe from @nytcooking, or tag a friend who would love it. 🐔 @linda.xiao took this photo, with food styling by @bwashbu.

  •  29,988  0  24 August, 2019
  • David Koch, the billionaire who fueled a powerful right-wing libertarian movement that helped reshape American politics, has died at 79. Together with his brother Charles, who announced his death, he amassed a multibillion-dollar fortune from the corporate behemoth they ran, and became the early public face of the Koch political ascendancy as the Libertarian Party’s candidate for vice president in 1980. The Koch (pronounced “coke”) brothers’ money-fueled brand of libertarianism helped give rise to the Tea Party movement. David Koch also became a nationally known philanthropist: His name is emblazoned throughout Manhattan institutions — at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the American Museum of Natural History and New York-Presbyterian Hospital — on which some of his $1.2 billion in charitable gifts were bestowed. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @robertcaplin took this photo of David Koch at Lincoln Center.
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    David Koch, the billionaire who fueled a powerful right-wing libertarian movement that helped reshape American politics, has died at 79. Together with his brother Charles, who announced his death, he amassed a multibillion-dollar fortune from the corporate behemoth they ran, and became the early public face of the Koch political ascendancy as the Libertarian Party’s candidate for vice president in 1980. The Koch (pronounced “coke”) brothers’ money-fueled brand of libertarianism helped give rise to the Tea Party movement. David Koch also became a nationally known philanthropist: His name is emblazoned throughout Manhattan institutions — at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the American Museum of Natural History and New York-Presbyterian Hospital — on which some of his $1.2 billion in charitable gifts were bestowed. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @robertcaplin took this photo of David Koch at Lincoln Center.

  •  14,264  0  23 August, 2019
  • Komodo dragons resemble dinosaurs that missed their cue for extinction, but environmentalists worry an invasion of tourists to their island lair could bring them to a similar fate. The 10-foot lizards are native only to a scattering of islands in Indonesia, and while Komodo tourism generates significant cash for one of the country’s poorest regions, it has also brought piles of trash, human encroachment and occasional lizard smuggling. Like other tourist destinations around the world, from Venice to the Galápagos, Komodo National Park is at risk of being wrecked by its own popularity. Some environmentalists worry that the stampede of visitors has set the ecosystem off kilter, and local leaders aim to close the island of Komodo, where the largest population of dragons lives, for at least a year. Even residents would have to leave. “If we don’t give the dragons their habitat, they will be extinct within the next 50 to 100 years,” the island’s deputy governor said. @adamjdean took these photos.
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    Komodo dragons resemble dinosaurs that missed their cue for extinction, but environmentalists worry an invasion of tourists to their island lair could bring them to a similar fate. The 10-foot lizards are native only to a scattering of islands in Indonesia, and while Komodo tourism generates significant cash for one of the country’s poorest regions, it has also brought piles of trash, human encroachment and occasional lizard smuggling. Like other tourist destinations around the world, from Venice to the Galápagos, Komodo National Park is at risk of being wrecked by its own popularity. Some environmentalists worry that the stampede of visitors has set the ecosystem off kilter, and local leaders aim to close the island of Komodo, where the largest population of dragons lives, for at least a year. Even residents would have to leave. “If we don’t give the dragons their habitat, they will be extinct within the next 50 to 100 years,” the island’s deputy governor said. @adamjdean took these photos.

  •  29,321  0  23 August, 2019
  • The Haunted Mansion, treasured as one of Disneyland’s quirkier rides, has long been a fan favorite for expertly combining the fun and the frightful. You get into your “doom buggy” and it starts off scary, but then you get whisked off to where spirits dance through the ballroom, and the journey culminates in a graveyard party. Other Disneyland rides have come and gone over the years, getting updates  to reflect new films — but the Mansion, which turns 50 this month, has been a constant for decades. And it’s not just a hit with regular visitors – it’s also a favorite among Disney Parks employees. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @alexandercoggin took this photo of Madame Leota, a character inside a crystal ball at the Mansion.
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    Disneyland California

    The Haunted Mansion, treasured as one of Disneyland’s quirkier rides, has long been a fan favorite for expertly combining the fun and the frightful. You get into your “doom buggy” and it starts off scary, but then you get whisked off to where spirits dance through the ballroom, and the journey culminates in a graveyard party. Other Disneyland rides have come and gone over the years, getting updates to reflect new films — but the Mansion, which turns 50 this month, has been a constant for decades. And it’s not just a hit with regular visitors – it’s also a favorite among Disney Parks employees. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @alexandercoggin took this photo of Madame Leota, a character inside a crystal ball at the Mansion.

  •  14,099  0  23 August, 2019
  • What worries Iceland? A world without ice – and it’s preparing. Glaciers occupy over a tenth of Iceland, and every single one is melting. That prospect has jolted Icelanders — and some visitors — to a realization that they are witnessing a treasure vanish. As rising temperatures drastically reshape this famously frigid island, businesses and the government are spending millions to try to turn the warming climate into an economic advantage. Reforestation, land conservation and carbon-free transport projects that can help slash greenhouse gas emissions have become new focuses as the ice melts away. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @suziehowellphoto took this photo.
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    What worries Iceland? A world without ice – and it’s preparing. Glaciers occupy over a tenth of Iceland, and every single one is melting. That prospect has jolted Icelanders — and some visitors — to a realization that they are witnessing a treasure vanish. As rising temperatures drastically reshape this famously frigid island, businesses and the government are spending millions to try to turn the warming climate into an economic advantage. Reforestation, land conservation and carbon-free transport projects that can help slash greenhouse gas emissions have become new focuses as the ice melts away. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @suziehowellphoto took this photo.

  •  27,007  0  23 August, 2019
  • Secret rooms have appeared throughout history, from hidden passageways in medieval castles to Prohibition-era speakeasies. Now they’re popping up in workplaces, offering the appeal of a space reserved for V.I.P.s and a respite from open plans. “They add a moment of discovery in a workplace — a surprise for employees and visitors,” said Samantha McCormack, a creative director at @tpgarchitecture, an interior design firm that has tucked all sorts of secret rooms into clients’ offices. @jeenahmoon shot these photos. Visit the link in our bio to see more secret spaces.
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    Secret rooms have appeared throughout history, from hidden passageways in medieval castles to Prohibition-era speakeasies. Now they’re popping up in workplaces, offering the appeal of a space reserved for V.I.P.s and a respite from open plans. “They add a moment of discovery in a workplace — a surprise for employees and visitors,” said Samantha McCormack, a creative director at @tpgarchitecture, an interior design firm that has tucked all sorts of secret rooms into clients’ offices. @jeenahmoon shot these photos. Visit the link in our bio to see more secret spaces.

  •  12,325  0  22 August, 2019
  • Tsholofelo Msimango was dying. At 57 pounds, she was stricken with a drug-resistant strain of tuberculosis when she joined a trial of new drugs to combat it. Now 5 years later, she is 25, tuberculosis-free and healthy at 103 pounds – and she also has a young son. Tuberculosis has surpassed AIDS as the world’s leading infectious cause of death, and a lethal strain called XDR is resistant to all 4 families of antibiotics typically used to fight the disease. The drug trial Tsholofelo joined was small, only 109 patients, but the results have been groundbreaking: It has a 90% success rate against drug-resistant tuberculosis. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @joaosilva_nyt took this photo of Tsholofelo with her son.
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    Tsholofelo Msimango was dying. At 57 pounds, she was stricken with a drug-resistant strain of tuberculosis when she joined a trial of new drugs to combat it. Now 5 years later, she is 25, tuberculosis-free and healthy at 103 pounds – and she also has a young son. Tuberculosis has surpassed AIDS as the world’s leading infectious cause of death, and a lethal strain called XDR is resistant to all 4 families of antibiotics typically used to fight the disease. The drug trial Tsholofelo joined was small, only 109 patients, but the results have been groundbreaking: It has a 90% success rate against drug-resistant tuberculosis. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @joaosilva_nyt took this photo of Tsholofelo with her son.

  •  20,927  0  22 August, 2019
  • Two years ago, more than 730,000 Rohingya started fleeing from Myanmar to Bangladesh to escape a vicious campaign of ethnic cleansing. Governments from both countries vowed that a return of the Muslim minority to Myanmar was imminent. But that promise has been repeatedly broken, as multiple repatriation deadlines have passed without action. Thursday was one of them. The Myanmar government said it would begin the repatriation of 3,450 Rohingya — but it has done little to reassure them that the conditions that led to the mass killings have changed. Many Rohingya — now living in squalid conditions in the world’s largest refugee camp — were terrified, not joyful, to learn that they were on the repatriation list. If they returned home, it would be to a stretch of land emptied by ethnic cleansing, and dotted with burned mosques and charred palms. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @adamjdean took this photo of the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh.
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    Two years ago, more than 730,000 Rohingya started fleeing from Myanmar to Bangladesh to escape a vicious campaign of ethnic cleansing. Governments from both countries vowed that a return of the Muslim minority to Myanmar was imminent. But that promise has been repeatedly broken, as multiple repatriation deadlines have passed without action. Thursday was one of them. The Myanmar government said it would begin the repatriation of 3,450 Rohingya — but it has done little to reassure them that the conditions that led to the mass killings have changed. Many Rohingya — now living in squalid conditions in the world’s largest refugee camp — were terrified, not joyful, to learn that they were on the repatriation list. If they returned home, it would be to a stretch of land emptied by ethnic cleansing, and dotted with burned mosques and charred palms. Visit the link in our bio to read more. @adamjdean took this photo of the Kutupalong Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh.

  •  16,888  0  22 August, 2019
  • Goodyear built its first blimp in 1917 for the U.S. Navy, but in 1930, the whole family of airships reunited for the first time since their construction over the Goodyear Airdock in Akron, Ohio, and celebrated with this flyover. We took a trip through our photo archive to find one striking image from each U.S. state. Can you guess which image matches which state? Check out our Instagram story and visit the link in our bio to take the quiz.
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    Goodyear built its first blimp in 1917 for the U.S. Navy, but in 1930, the whole family of airships reunited for the first time since their construction over the Goodyear Airdock in Akron, Ohio, and celebrated with this flyover. We took a trip through our photo archive to find one striking image from each U.S. state. Can you guess which image matches which state? Check out our Instagram story and visit the link in our bio to take the quiz.

  •  15,746  0  22 August, 2019
  • Update: This replaces an earlier post that incorrectly referred to the area that had an 84% increase in fires from last year to this year. It was all of Brazil, not the Amazon rain forest.⁣⁣
⁣⁣
The blazes are so large and widespread that smoke has wafted thousands of miles away to the Atlantic coast and São Paulo. Residents of the city, Brazil’s most populous, have shared photos of the skies turning dark during the day as the smoke blows in and blots out the sun. Most of the fires have occurred in deforested areas, where trees are cut down for market and then loggers and farmers burn the rest to clear the land. But the flames have spread throughout the forest and have also reached populated areas in Brazil’s northern states. On Wednesday, the country’s president, Jair Bolsonaro, accused nongovernmental organizations of setting the fires after having their funding pulled. But critics say his policies have emboldened loggers, farmers and miners who want to clear out land illegally. This is a developing story. Visit the link in our bio to read more.
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    Update: This replaces an earlier post that incorrectly referred to the area that had an 84% increase in fires from last year to this year. It was all of Brazil, not the Amazon rain forest.⁣⁣
    ⁣⁣
    The blazes are so large and widespread that smoke has wafted thousands of miles away to the Atlantic coast and São Paulo. Residents of the city, Brazil’s most populous, have shared photos of the skies turning dark during the day as the smoke blows in and blots out the sun. Most of the fires have occurred in deforested areas, where trees are cut down for market and then loggers and farmers burn the rest to clear the land. But the flames have spread throughout the forest and have also reached populated areas in Brazil’s northern states. On Wednesday, the country’s president, Jair Bolsonaro, accused nongovernmental organizations of setting the fires after having their funding pulled. But critics say his policies have emboldened loggers, farmers and miners who want to clear out land illegally. This is a developing story. Visit the link in our bio to read more.

  •  18,763  0  22 August, 2019