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  • Félix Auger-Aliassime is not the only rising star in men’s tennis who is expected to win grand slams someday, but he is the youngest. Two years ago, after his 17th birthday, he became the youngest man to break into the Top Two Hundred since Rafael Nadal did it, in 2002. At the link in our bio, read about the teen-age tennis phenom bringing a new story to the men’s game. Photographs by @jaredsoares for The New Yorker.
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    Félix Auger-Aliassime is not the only rising star in men’s tennis who is expected to win grand slams someday, but he is the youngest. Two years ago, after his 17th birthday, he became the youngest man to break into the Top Two Hundred since Rafael Nadal did it, in 2002. At the link in our bio, read about the teen-age tennis phenom bringing a new story to the men’s game. Photographs by @jaredsoares for The New Yorker.

  •  2,426  0  56 minutes ago
  • An engaging show at the Clark Art Institute, in Williamstown, Massachusetts, centers on Renoir’s prodigious output of female nudes—and sparks a sense of crisis. Tap the link in our bio to read Peter Schjeldahl on revisiting the work of the once exalted, still unshakably canonical, Impressionist.
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    An engaging show at the Clark Art Institute, in Williamstown, Massachusetts, centers on Renoir’s prodigious output of female nudes—and sparks a sense of crisis. Tap the link in our bio to read Peter Schjeldahl on revisiting the work of the once exalted, still unshakably canonical, Impressionist.

  •  7,698  0  3 hours ago
  • Earlier this week, “Bad Guy,” a spooky, twitching single by the 17-year-old singer and songwriter Billie Eilish, unseated Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road” from the top of the Billboard chart. Eilish is speaking directly to a generation of people who, like her, were born either right before or right after 9/11, which means they’re intimately familiar with feelings of worry and instability on a macro level. Tap the link in our bio to read Amanda Petrusich on one of the first pop stars of a new epoch, in which the challenge of staying alive can only be counterbalanced by an embrace of the absurd. Photograph by Elbaz Melanie / DAPR / ZUMA.
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    Earlier this week, “Bad Guy,” a spooky, twitching single by the 17-year-old singer and songwriter Billie Eilish, unseated Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road” from the top of the Billboard chart. Eilish is speaking directly to a generation of people who, like her, were born either right before or right after 9/11, which means they’re intimately familiar with feelings of worry and instability on a macro level. Tap the link in our bio to read Amanda Petrusich on one of the first pop stars of a new epoch, in which the challenge of staying alive can only be counterbalanced by an embrace of the absurd. Photograph by Elbaz Melanie / DAPR / ZUMA.

  •  10,965  0  6 hours ago
  • The photographer Michael Jang’s work from the 1970s, which he rediscovered three decades later, offers a snapshot of life in California during the era. At the time, Jang was an art student who snuck into lavish parties, went to punk shows, and wandered the streets. His photographs are mischievous and quirky, full of visual jokes about how the rich and famous and the freaks and burnouts weren’t all that different from one another. Tap the link in our bio to see more of his photos of L.A. glitz, San Francisco subcultures, and his Chinese-American family. Photographs by Michael Jang / Courtesy Atelier Éditions.
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    The photographer Michael Jang’s work from the 1970s, which he rediscovered three decades later, offers a snapshot of life in California during the era. At the time, Jang was an art student who snuck into lavish parties, went to punk shows, and wandered the streets. His photographs are mischievous and quirky, full of visual jokes about how the rich and famous and the freaks and burnouts weren’t all that different from one another. Tap the link in our bio to see more of his photos of L.A. glitz, San Francisco subcultures, and his Chinese-American family. Photographs by Michael Jang / Courtesy Atelier Éditions.

  •  8,361  0  24 August, 2019
  • The @borowitzreport: A man with no identifiable skills is deeply worried that a recession could cause him to lose his job, people close to the man have confirmed. Read the story at the link in our bio, and follow @borowitzreport for more.
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    The @borowitzreport: A man with no identifiable skills is deeply worried that a recession could cause him to lose his job, people close to the man have confirmed. Read the story at the link in our bio, and follow @borowitzreport for more.

  •  37,273  0  24 August, 2019
  • After another soul-depleting week in which the President of the United States dismissed the transformation of the global climate as a “Chinese hoax,” laid waste to countless environmental laws, and most recently, referred to himself as "the Chosen One," David Remnick urges Americans to avoid despair: “Despair is a form of self-indulgence, a dodge,” he writes. Tap the link in our bio to read more.
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    After another soul-depleting week in which the President of the United States dismissed the transformation of the global climate as a “Chinese hoax,” laid waste to countless environmental laws, and most recently, referred to himself as "the Chosen One," David Remnick urges Americans to avoid despair: “Despair is a form of self-indulgence, a dodge,” he writes. Tap the link in our bio to read more.

  •  30,573  0  23 August, 2019
  • David Koch, who has died at 79, was a lifelong libertarian who believed in drastically lower personal and corporate taxes, minimal social services, and much less oversight of industry—especially environmental regulation. Tap the link in our bio to read Jane Mayer's 2010 report on the billionaire Koch brothers. Photograph by Richard Schulman / Corbis.
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    David Koch, who has died at 79, was a lifelong libertarian who believed in drastically lower personal and corporate taxes, minimal social services, and much less oversight of industry—especially environmental regulation. Tap the link in our bio to read Jane Mayer's 2010 report on the billionaire Koch brothers. Photograph by Richard Schulman / Corbis.

  •  7,115  0  23 August, 2019
  • The 2020 Presidential candidates recently started rolling out their campaign songs. Our staff writer @amandapetrusich looks at the themes of this year's crop—a genre-crossing group that encompasses Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5,” Mary J. Blige’s “Work That,” and even Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road”—and considers what each song says about its candidate. Tap the link in our bio to watch the full video.
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    The 2020 Presidential candidates recently started rolling out their campaign songs. Our staff writer @amandapetrusich looks at the themes of this year's crop—a genre-crossing group that encompasses Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5,” Mary J. Blige’s “Work That,” and even Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road”—and considers what each song says about its candidate. Tap the link in our bio to watch the full video.

  •  3,707  0  22 August, 2019
  • In 1929, W. E. B. Du Bois debated the white supremacist Lothrop Stoddard on the topic of racial inequality. Stoddard’s writing was inspired by one of history’s most famously racist books, “The Passing of the Great Race,” which puts forth the ridiculous thesis that all of Western civilization was created by a race of tall, blond, warlike people who ventured down from Northern Europe every so often to help start great cultures. Tap the link in our bio to read about what happened when the 20th century’s leading black intellectual debated a Nazi-loving racist. (Spoiler: it did not end well for Stoddard.) Illustration by Christian Northeast.
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    In 1929, W. E. B. Du Bois debated the white supremacist Lothrop Stoddard on the topic of racial inequality. Stoddard’s writing was inspired by one of history’s most famously racist books, “The Passing of the Great Race,” which puts forth the ridiculous thesis that all of Western civilization was created by a race of tall, blond, warlike people who ventured down from Northern Europe every so often to help start great cultures. Tap the link in our bio to read about what happened when the 20th century’s leading black intellectual debated a Nazi-loving racist. (Spoiler: it did not end well for Stoddard.) Illustration by Christian Northeast.

  •  9,629  0  22 August, 2019