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Forbes India

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  • Brazil’s Amazon Rainforest has been ablaze for 16 straight days, and it is only one of the 73,000 forest fires that have been detected in 2019, according to the country’s space agency – National Institute for Space Research (INPE). The Amazon Rain Forest is called the lungs of the world. It produces about 20 percent of the world’s oxygen. With a forest fire raging in the forest for the 16th straight day, killing wild life and destroying the homes of millions of people who live there. Here’s a look at some facts about the Amazon.
#amazonrainforest
#saveourplanet #prayforamazonia
  • @forbesindia Profile picture

    @forbesindia

    Brazil’s Amazon Rainforest has been ablaze for 16 straight days, and it is only one of the 73,000 forest fires that have been detected in 2019, according to the country’s space agency – National Institute for Space Research (INPE). The Amazon Rain Forest is called the lungs of the world. It produces about 20 percent of the world’s oxygen. With a forest fire raging in the forest for the 16th straight day, killing wild life and destroying the homes of millions of people who live there. Here’s a look at some facts about the Amazon.
    #amazonrainforest
    #saveourplanet #prayforamazonia

  •  7,811  0  22 August, 2019
  • As #Spiderman leaves the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a look at which banner has historically worked out better for the franchise: Sony's Spider-Man or Marvel's
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    @forbesindia

    As #Spiderman leaves the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a look at which banner has historically worked out better for the franchise: Sony's Spider-Man or Marvel's

  •  3,914  0  21 August, 2019
  • South Africa’s response to rhinoceros poaching—it is home to 20,000 white rhinos and 5,500 black rhinos—is to surgically dehorn the animals, so that they are not of any use to poachers who sell their horns. Home to the two varieties of two-horned rhinos, the African continent has long been struggling to conserve these animals. The near-threatened whites are larger than the blacks, have a square lip and are grazers; the critically endangered black rhinos have a hooked lip and feed on leaves of bushes and trees. Rhinos are one of the Big Five animals that are sought out by tourists, and are also hot targets for poachers. And despite efforts, 728 were killed in 2018, according to the International Rhino Foundation (IRF). Poachers target the rhinos for their horns, which contain keratin. Once cut, the horn regrows to its full size in a couple of years. These horns are in great demand in the Asian black market, primarily China and Vietnam, for its supposed medicinal and aphrodisiac properties. While dehorning has helped save the rhinos in reserves such as the Phinda Private Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, it has also meant that poachers gravitate towards those reserves where the pachyderms haven’t been dehorned. One of the main reasons for all rhinos not being dehorned, is the cost involved. | By Rathina Sankari
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    @forbesindia

    South Africa’s response to rhinoceros poaching—it is home to 20,000 white rhinos and 5,500 black rhinos—is to surgically dehorn the animals, so that they are not of any use to poachers who sell their horns. Home to the two varieties of two-horned rhinos, the African continent has long been struggling to conserve these animals. The near-threatened whites are larger than the blacks, have a square lip and are grazers; the critically endangered black rhinos have a hooked lip and feed on leaves of bushes and trees. Rhinos are one of the Big Five animals that are sought out by tourists, and are also hot targets for poachers. And despite efforts, 728 were killed in 2018, according to the International Rhino Foundation (IRF). Poachers target the rhinos for their horns, which contain keratin. Once cut, the horn regrows to its full size in a couple of years. These horns are in great demand in the Asian black market, primarily China and Vietnam, for its supposed medicinal and aphrodisiac properties. While dehorning has helped save the rhinos in reserves such as the Phinda Private Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, it has also meant that poachers gravitate towards those reserves where the pachyderms haven’t been dehorned. One of the main reasons for all rhinos not being dehorned, is the cost involved. | By Rathina Sankari

  •  942  0  21 August, 2019
  • When Lightspeed India Partners set up its first India fund, worth $135 million (₹926 crore), in 2015, it had already had a taste of the potential of Indian startups. Beginning with a $7 million (₹48 crore) investment in online tutorial Tutorvista in 2006, the US-based Lightspeed Venture Partners had zeroed in on future unicorn Oyo in 2013. Within a year of being set up, the India fund pocketed two more future unicorns, Udaan and Byju’s.

For a venture capital firm that started its India fund only four years ago, this early-stage investor now stands out for backing companies that have become some of India’s most valuable startups. It even raised a second India fund worth $175 million (₹1,200 crore) in 2018, and has 30 startups in its portfolio by now. Through the volatility of the markets, Lightspeed maintains its investments by “developing a thesis and conviction” in each of them, says Bejul Somaia, the firm’s senior most partner in India. It then finds high-quality entrepreneurs who “square off” with those theses and who have read the market in the same way | By Harichandan Arakali #VCSpecial [Bejul Somia (left) and Dev Khare, partners, Lightspeed India Partners; Image: Nishal Lama for Forbes India]
  • @forbesindia Profile picture

    @forbesindia

    When Lightspeed India Partners set up its first India fund, worth $135 million (₹926 crore), in 2015, it had already had a taste of the potential of Indian startups. Beginning with a $7 million (₹48 crore) investment in online tutorial Tutorvista in 2006, the US-based Lightspeed Venture Partners had zeroed in on future unicorn Oyo in 2013. Within a year of being set up, the India fund pocketed two more future unicorns, Udaan and Byju’s.

    For a venture capital firm that started its India fund only four years ago, this early-stage investor now stands out for backing companies that have become some of India’s most valuable startups. It even raised a second India fund worth $175 million (₹1,200 crore) in 2018, and has 30 startups in its portfolio by now. Through the volatility of the markets, Lightspeed maintains its investments by “developing a thesis and conviction” in each of them, says Bejul Somaia, the firm’s senior most partner in India. It then finds high-quality entrepreneurs who “square off” with those theses and who have read the market in the same way | By Harichandan Arakali #VCSpecial [Bejul Somia (left) and Dev Khare, partners, Lightspeed India Partners; Image: Nishal Lama for Forbes India]

  •  830  0  20 August, 2019
  • Truck maker Ashok Leyland is rapidly moving towards new emission norms and electric vehicles with initiatives to engage and encourage employees

Managing changes in technology requires different skill sets. For a company such as Ashok Leyland, “from a very established way of making engines to now looking at new norms...[and] be ready by May 2020 is a huge challenge,” says Uma Rao, head of human resources (HR) for medium and heavy commercial vehicles, the company’s flagship unit. Over the last two years, the HR team has led several communication activities, roping in the managing director and other senior leaders, and held ‘tech fests’ to familiarise people with the new engines and technologies. The team helped identify foreign engine experts and brought them to coach and guide company engineers; they also brought together talented people within the company to work on this transition | By Harichandan Arakali [Image - (From left) Uma Rao, head of HR for medium and heavy commercial vehicles, and NV Balachandar, head of HR] #IndiasBestEmployers
  • @forbesindia Profile picture

    @forbesindia

    Truck maker Ashok Leyland is rapidly moving towards new emission norms and electric vehicles with initiatives to engage and encourage employees

    Managing changes in technology requires different skill sets. For a company such as Ashok Leyland, “from a very established way of making engines to now looking at new norms...[and] be ready by May 2020 is a huge challenge,” says Uma Rao, head of human resources (HR) for medium and heavy commercial vehicles, the company’s flagship unit. Over the last two years, the HR team has led several communication activities, roping in the managing director and other senior leaders, and held ‘tech fests’ to familiarise people with the new engines and technologies. The team helped identify foreign engine experts and brought them to coach and guide company engineers; they also brought together talented people within the company to work on this transition | By Harichandan Arakali [Image - (From left) Uma Rao, head of HR for medium and heavy commercial vehicles, and NV Balachandar, head of HR] #IndiasBestEmployers

  •  2,006  0  19 August, 2019