Craig Welch ( @craigwelch ) Instagram Profile

craigwelch

Craig Welch

Senior writer @natgeo. Enthusiastic but average runner. Angler. Dad. Must have mountains. Also sea.

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  • 998 following

Craig Welch Profile Information

  • This.
REPOST from @melissalesh **
Sound on 🔊 This is what an intact jungle looks like. Sounds like. This is an ocelot in its natural home, one of so many creatures that rely on the Amazon Rainforest, including us. News of the uncontrolled fires has been absolutely devastating. Although the aerial footage at the end of this clip might look like flames, this is a sunrise blazing down through water rising as clouds, footage I captured a few months ago. The beauty of a system in balance keeping our planet alive is not something easily put into words. Now, smoke can be seen from space. The signals continue to come..
#prayforamazonia #weneedmorethanprayers #actonclimate
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    @craigwelch

    This.
    REPOST from @melissalesh **
    Sound on 🔊 This is what an intact jungle looks like. Sounds like. This is an ocelot in its natural home, one of so many creatures that rely on the Amazon Rainforest, including us. News of the uncontrolled fires has been absolutely devastating. Although the aerial footage at the end of this clip might look like flames, this is a sunrise blazing down through water rising as clouds, footage I captured a few months ago. The beauty of a system in balance keeping our planet alive is not something easily put into words. Now, smoke can be seen from space. The signals continue to come..
    #prayforamazonia #weneedmorethanprayers #actonclimate

  •  189  0  23 August, 2019
  • Special September issue out today, including our permafrost story (link in bio). Terrific work, all. Repost from @emmetsmith - New Cover: The Arctic is Heating Up. You’re looking at the minimum recorded sea ice in the Arctic, September 2012. By September 2036, scientists project there will be none. The impacts on our climate and politics are staggering. Image by @mcanalesgraphics, @antoine_collignon, @tvdvd and @tsickley. Special kudos to @typesupply for the custom lettering.
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    @craigwelch

    Special September issue out today, including our permafrost story (link in bio). Terrific work, all. Repost from @emmetsmith - New Cover: The Arctic is Heating Up. You’re looking at the minimum recorded sea ice in the Arctic, September 2012. By September 2036, scientists project there will be none. The impacts on our climate and politics are staggering. Image by @mcanalesgraphics, @antoine_collignon, @tvdvd and @tsickley. Special kudos to @typesupply for the custom lettering.

  •  239  0  15 August, 2019
  • Repost from @katieorlinsky - Methane Bubbles. Smith Lake in Fairbanks, Alaska. 
From “The Carbon Threat” (link in bio) for @natgeo written by @craigwelch.

That fire photo from yesterday…this is where it comes from. As permafrost thaws it creates lakes and ponds which release methane bubbles into the water. When the water freezes in winter, it traps the bubbles in ice. So if you punch a hole through the ice, the gas escapes and can be set on fire, as seen in my last post when @uafairbanks scientists demonstrated this for me last winter. 
The methane gas that bubbles from the oxygen- deprived mud under ponds and lakes is quite beautiful; it is also 25 times as potent a greenhouse gas as CO2. All permafrost thaw leads to greenhouse gas emissions, but lakes and ponds like the one seen here accelerate the threat. @uafairbanks ecologist Katey Walter Anthony has been measuring the methane coming from Arctic lakes for two decades. Her latest calculations, published in 2018, suggest that new lakes created by abrupt thaw could nearly triple the greenhouse gas emissions expected from permafrost. That means we need to curb our own fossil fuel use even faster. @insidenatgeo #climatechange
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    @craigwelch

    Repost from @katieorlinsky - Methane Bubbles. Smith Lake in Fairbanks, Alaska.
    From “The Carbon Threat” (link in bio) for @natgeo written by @craigwelch.

    That fire photo from yesterday…this is where it comes from. As permafrost thaws it creates lakes and ponds which release methane bubbles into the water. When the water freezes in winter, it traps the bubbles in ice. So if you punch a hole through the ice, the gas escapes and can be set on fire, as seen in my last post when @uafairbanks scientists demonstrated this for me last winter.
    The methane gas that bubbles from the oxygen- deprived mud under ponds and lakes is quite beautiful; it is also 25 times as potent a greenhouse gas as CO2. All permafrost thaw leads to greenhouse gas emissions, but lakes and ponds like the one seen here accelerate the threat. @uafairbanks ecologist Katey Walter Anthony has been measuring the methane coming from Arctic lakes for two decades. Her latest calculations, published in 2018, suggest that new lakes created by abrupt thaw could nearly triple the greenhouse gas emissions expected from permafrost. That means we need to curb our own fossil fuel use even faster. @insidenatgeo #climatechange

  •  117  0  14 August, 2019
  • Story LINK IN BIO! Repost from @natgeo Photo by @katieorlinsky | I've been photographing in the Arctic for close to six years, trying to tell stories that put a human face on climate change. For nearly two of those years I've been working on “The Carbon Threat” for @natgeo, online today. The article, written by @craigwelch, tackles the urgent subject of permafrost thaw. 
It has been one of the most challenging stories I have ever photographed, a journey that fluctuated from frustrating and
disturbing to fascinating and inspiring at a moment's notice.  What is happening to our planet is not easy to swallow, but we must confront it head-on. I hope our article can help the public and policymakers recognize this new, groundbreaking reality and take action. 
Arctic permafrost is thawing much faster than expected, releasing carbon gases that could drastically speed up climate
change. Scientists say permafrost thaw may release nearly three times more greenhouse gases than expected. That means we’ll have to curb our own fossil fuel use even faster than lawmakers think. In this image, flammable methane, a potent greenhouse gas, bubbles from the thawing permafrost beneath a frozen lake. When you punch a hole through the ice, the gas escapes and can be measured—or set on fire— as a scientist demonstrates here.
Permafrost refers to the layer of continuously frozen soil that covers almost 1/4th of the Earth’s surface, found mostly in the Arctic. Most permafrost areas have been frozen for more than 10,000 years. And trapped inside permafrost are thousands of years of organic matter that decomposes as the ground thaws. That thawing ground slumps, allowing water to pool into millions of new ponds and lakes. These lakes—created this way or by beavers invading the far north—then chew through more permafrost. But they also allow all that organic matter to escape as methane, which is 25 times (or more) as potent a greenhouse gas as CO2. #climatechange #arcticforever #polar #alaska #russia #onassignment #storytelling
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    @craigwelch

    Story LINK IN BIO! Repost from @natgeo Photo by @katieorlinsky | I've been photographing in the Arctic for close to six years, trying to tell stories that put a human face on climate change. For nearly two of those years I've been working on “The Carbon Threat” for @natgeo, online today. The article, written by @craigwelch, tackles the urgent subject of permafrost thaw.
    It has been one of the most challenging stories I have ever photographed, a journey that fluctuated from frustrating and
    disturbing to fascinating and inspiring at a moment's notice. What is happening to our planet is not easy to swallow, but we must confront it head-on. I hope our article can help the public and policymakers recognize this new, groundbreaking reality and take action.
    Arctic permafrost is thawing much faster than expected, releasing carbon gases that could drastically speed up climate
    change. Scientists say permafrost thaw may release nearly three times more greenhouse gases than expected. That means we’ll have to curb our own fossil fuel use even faster than lawmakers think. In this image, flammable methane, a potent greenhouse gas, bubbles from the thawing permafrost beneath a frozen lake. When you punch a hole through the ice, the gas escapes and can be measured—or set on fire— as a scientist demonstrates here.
    Permafrost refers to the layer of continuously frozen soil that covers almost 1/4th of the Earth’s surface, found mostly in the Arctic. Most permafrost areas have been frozen for more than 10,000 years. And trapped inside permafrost are thousands of years of organic matter that decomposes as the ground thaws. That thawing ground slumps, allowing water to pool into millions of new ponds and lakes. These lakes—created this way or by beavers invading the far north—then chew through more permafrost. But they also allow all that organic matter to escape as methane, which is 25 times (or more) as potent a greenhouse gas as CO2. #climatechange #arcticforever #polar #alaska #russia #onassignment #storytelling

  •  121  0  13 August, 2019
  • *NEW* LINK IN BIO it could hardly be more important: Thawing #Arctic ground is releasing far more carbon than once thought. That msg isn’t in #IPCC reports yet, which means it hasn’t even reached policymakers. So when #GreenNewDeal authors like @ocasio2018 and others say we have to cur fossil fuel use entirely by 2050... we actually have to move even faster than that. **
My September @natgeo mag story w/marvelous @katieorlinsky photos and @jasontreat graphics went online today. Please read and share. And let it help motivate us all. Thanks to @insidenatgeo for supporting our reporting. #climatechange #alaska #permafrost
  • @craigwelch Profile picture

    @craigwelch

    *NEW* LINK IN BIO it could hardly be more important: Thawing #Arctic ground is releasing far more carbon than once thought. That msg isn’t in #IPCC reports yet, which means it hasn’t even reached policymakers. So when #GreenNewDeal authors like @ocasio2018 and others say we have to cur fossil fuel use entirely by 2050... we actually have to move even faster than that. **
    My September @natgeo mag story w/marvelous @katieorlinsky photos and @jasontreat graphics went online today. Please read and share. And let it help motivate us all. Thanks to @insidenatgeo for supporting our reporting. #climatechange #alaska #permafrost

  •  135  0  13 August, 2019
  • Congrats, team! For more on our story see link in my bio.
*^
Repost from @cristinamittermeier HUGE news! In March 2017 I joined a @NatGeo expedition team in Antarctica, led by my partner @PaulNicklen, to create a film that we hoped would inspire people to help us protect the #Antarctic Peninsula. "Polar Obsession 360" a VR film, takes you on an epic adventure across raging seas and into a world where you come face to face with one of Antarctica's most charismatic creatures: a 1,000 pound leopard seal. Just this past spring, Polar Obsession won the 2019 People’s Choice Award, Webby Award for VR & 360 Video, and one Honoree mention from @thewebbyawards. Today, I am beyond excited to tell you that Polar Obsession has been nominated for the News and Documentary Emmy Awards in the Outstanding New Approaches: Documentary category. Congratulations to the entire team for their #EmmyNomination!
.

@blackdotfilmsvr, @Ladzinski Ignacio Ferrando Margelí and Frederic Lilien Shane Moore @PattersonImages @RodolfoWerner @CraigWelch, @Ianvaso, @Andy_Mann, #DionPoncet #JuliettePoncet Max Solomon and Malvina Martin from Black Dot who shot/produced/edited, Matt Zymet, Gabbi Ewing, Kaite Mullin
  • @craigwelch Profile picture

    @craigwelch

    Congrats, team! For more on our story see link in my bio.
    *^
    Repost from @cristinamittermeier HUGE news! In March 2017 I joined a @NatGeo expedition team in Antarctica, led by my partner @PaulNicklen, to create a film that we hoped would inspire people to help us protect the #Antarctic Peninsula. "Polar Obsession 360" a VR film, takes you on an epic adventure across raging seas and into a world where you come face to face with one of Antarctica's most charismatic creatures: a 1,000 pound leopard seal. Just this past spring, Polar Obsession won the 2019 People’s Choice Award, Webby Award for VR & 360 Video, and one Honoree mention from @thewebbyawards. Today, I am beyond excited to tell you that Polar Obsession has been nominated for the News and Documentary Emmy Awards in the Outstanding New Approaches: Documentary category. Congratulations to the entire team for their #EmmyNomination!
    .

    @blackdotfilmsvr, @Ladzinski Ignacio Ferrando Margelí and Frederic Lilien Shane Moore @PattersonImages @RodolfoWerner @CraigWelch, @Ianvaso, @Andy_Mann, #DionPoncet #JuliettePoncet Max Solomon and Malvina Martin from Black Dot who shot/produced/edited, Matt Zymet, Gabbi Ewing, Kaite Mullin

  •  126  0  3 August, 2019
  • The Amazon rainforest: enormous, hot, sticky, mesmerizing, intimidating, hot, and sticky. It was unexpected and wonderful and exhausting and unlike any place I have been. It got under my skin. Sometimes literally. The Amazon can be itchy. It can sting. Sometimes it has fangs. And I loved it. Welcome to the jungle. #onassignment for @natgeo and @insidenatgeo in #amazonrainforest #amazonriver #amazon #brazil #rionegro
1. Amazonian motmot, which woke us every morning at 5:30, caught in a mist net by ornithologists studying avian populations.
2. Ocelot track near camp. Camera traps showed jaguars and pumas also were frequent visitors.
3. Vine break.
4. Four-foot earthworm found among the leaves.
5. Communicating with spider monkeys and screaming pihas
6. View of #rainforest canopy from 30-meter research tower.
7. Sunrise in a clearing.
8. Me, excited and nervous (pit vipers, you know). Also sweaty.
9. Rio Negro swallowing forest at the tag end of rainy season.
10. Tarantula wasp with a stinger as long as a sewing needle. Seeing that thing fly? Every bit as freaky as it sounds.
  • @craigwelch Profile picture

    @craigwelch

    Amazonas

    The Amazon rainforest: enormous, hot, sticky, mesmerizing, intimidating, hot, and sticky. It was unexpected and wonderful and exhausting and unlike any place I have been. It got under my skin. Sometimes literally. The Amazon can be itchy. It can sting. Sometimes it has fangs. And I loved it. Welcome to the jungle. #onassignment for @natgeo and @insidenatgeo in #amazonrainforest #amazonriver #amazon #brazil #rionegro
    1. Amazonian motmot, which woke us every morning at 5:30, caught in a mist net by ornithologists studying avian populations.
    2. Ocelot track near camp. Camera traps showed jaguars and pumas also were frequent visitors.
    3. Vine break.
    4. Four-foot earthworm found among the leaves.
    5. Communicating with spider monkeys and screaming pihas
    6. View of #rainforest canopy from 30-meter research tower.
    7. Sunrise in a clearing.
    8. Me, excited and nervous (pit vipers, you know). Also sweaty.
    9. Rio Negro swallowing forest at the tag end of rainy season.
    10. Tarantula wasp with a stinger as long as a sewing needle. Seeing that thing fly? Every bit as freaky as it sounds.

  •  164  0  20 July, 2019
  • LISTEN. Into the jungle we went, finding something remarkable at every turn. Last week, we hiked through primary forest dozens of miles in all directions from any real development. We watched a skink lodged in the crack of a tree. An electric blue morpho butterfly the size of my face zipped across our path. A giant tarantula wasp with a stinger longer than the body of most bees alighted on a nearby tree. Beneath a harpy eagle’s nest we picked at the jaw bones of several sloths—victims of a raptor so powerful it has been known to fly off not just with its prey, but with the branch to which that prey still clung. We visited a creek where researchers once found an enormous, lounging anaconda they named “Anna.” Twenty-four hours before our journey an ornithologist had stumbled on a thick fer-de-lance piled up near where we would stop to watch birds. And everywhere we looked before heading back to camp for the night we heard the screeching, whistling, whooping, and chattering of rainforest life—screaming pihas, howling spider monkeys, and the endless symphony of a world of damp, hot, wet, green. #amazonrainforest #amazon #rainforest #brazil #spidermonkey #howlermonkey #piha #junglelife #onassignment for @natgeo and @insidenatgeo
  • @craigwelch Profile picture

    @craigwelch

    Amazonas

    LISTEN. Into the jungle we went, finding something remarkable at every turn. Last week, we hiked through primary forest dozens of miles in all directions from any real development. We watched a skink lodged in the crack of a tree. An electric blue morpho butterfly the size of my face zipped across our path. A giant tarantula wasp with a stinger longer than the body of most bees alighted on a nearby tree. Beneath a harpy eagle’s nest we picked at the jaw bones of several sloths—victims of a raptor so powerful it has been known to fly off not just with its prey, but with the branch to which that prey still clung. We visited a creek where researchers once found an enormous, lounging anaconda they named “Anna.” Twenty-four hours before our journey an ornithologist had stumbled on a thick fer-de-lance piled up near where we would stop to watch birds. And everywhere we looked before heading back to camp for the night we heard the screeching, whistling, whooping, and chattering of rainforest life—screaming pihas, howling spider monkeys, and the endless symphony of a world of damp, hot, wet, green. #amazonrainforest #amazon #rainforest #brazil #spidermonkey #howlermonkey #piha #junglelife #onassignment for @natgeo and @insidenatgeo

  •  69  0  17 July, 2019
  • Hard to fathom what’s before me: the largest black water river on earth; one of the largest tributaries of the planet’s most massive river system; the gateway to the world’s most significant rainforest, which in turn is home to one-third of the planet’s known species. Behold the Rio Negro, not far from the “Meeting of the Waters,” my first view—ever—of the mighty #AmazonRiver and the #amazonrainforest #onassignment in #brazil for @NatGeo with @insidenatgeo
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    @craigwelch

    Manaus, Brazil

    Hard to fathom what’s before me: the largest black water river on earth; one of the largest tributaries of the planet’s most massive river system; the gateway to the world’s most significant rainforest, which in turn is home to one-third of the planet’s known species. Behold the Rio Negro, not far from the “Meeting of the Waters,” my first view—ever—of the mighty #AmazonRiver and the #amazonrainforest #onassignment in #brazil for @NatGeo with @insidenatgeo

  •  92  0  12 July, 2019