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  •  13  1  16 November, 2019
  • 💕over coffee at midnight💕
  • 💕over coffee at midnight💕

  •  37  2  16 November, 2019
  • “got a heart that likes to vandalize”
  • “got a heart that likes to vandalize”

  •  39  2  16 November, 2019
  • Sadie and I took a walk today to the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden by the Walker Art Center. These are two of my favorite sculptures. It is absolutely incredible to think that the horse is made of cast bronze when it still looks so much like the sticks and bark it was originally made from. It is also incredible to look at the man and see how the metal is bent to look like folds in the clothing. Absolutely amazing what these artists did. #walkerartcenter #metal #bronze
  • Sadie and I took a walk today to the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden by the Walker Art Center. These are two of my favorite sculptures. It is absolutely incredible to think that the horse is made of cast bronze when it still looks so much like the sticks and bark it was originally made from. It is also incredible to look at the man and see how the metal is bent to look like folds in the clothing. Absolutely amazing what these artists did. #walkerartcenter #metal #bronze

  •  3  0  16 November, 2019
  • "You should never think about the pot independent of those who might gather with it. A thing without people is not really a thing"
Theaster Gates at the Walker
.
.
#theastergates #walkerartcenter
  • "You should never think about the pot independent of those who might gather with it. A thing without people is not really a thing"
    Theaster Gates at the Walker
    .
    .
    #theastergates #walkerartcenter

  •  80  2  15 November, 2019
  • Instead of delicately hued flowers and landscapes of New Mexico, Georgia O’Keeffe's early work was inspired by cityscapes and the rural environment of Lake George, New York, which she visited annually.⁠
⁠
Of an old barn on the Lake George property, she wrote: You could see it from the kitchen window or from the window of Stieglitz’s sitting room. With much effort I painted a picture of the front part of the barn. I had never painted anything like that before. After that I painted the side where all the paint was gone with south wind. It was weathered gray—with one broken pane in the small window.⁠
⁠
The barn motif, to which O’Keeffe would return often, also invokes her childhood farm home in Wisconsin, where she was born, #onthisday in 1887.⁠
⁠
Today we celebrate her legacy!⁠
—⁠
⁠
See this work in the exhibition "Five Ways In: Themes From the Collection." [Detail #GeorgiaOKeeffe, "Lake George Barns" (1926)] Collection #WalkerArtCenter⁠
⁠
  • Instead of delicately hued flowers and landscapes of New Mexico, Georgia O’Keeffe's early work was inspired by cityscapes and the rural environment of Lake George, New York, which she visited annually.⁠

    Of an old barn on the Lake George property, she wrote: You could see it from the kitchen window or from the window of Stieglitz’s sitting room. With much effort I painted a picture of the front part of the barn. I had never painted anything like that before. After that I painted the side where all the paint was gone with south wind. It was weathered gray—with one broken pane in the small window.⁠

    The barn motif, to which O’Keeffe would return often, also invokes her childhood farm home in Wisconsin, where she was born, #onthisday in 1887.⁠

    Today we celebrate her legacy!⁠
    —⁠

    See this work in the exhibition "Five Ways In: Themes From the Collection." [Detail #GeorgiaOKeeffe, "Lake George Barns" (1926)] Collection #WalkerArtCenter

  •  898  15  15 November, 2019
  • The stag is the king of the forest, the protector of all other creatures. For the native tribes of north america, the deer was a messanger, an animal of power, intuition and gentleness... and in buddhism, the deer symbolizes, harmony, happiness, peace and longevity. I tried to recreate the king stag necklace pendant on etsy using wire and an old clip-on earring, how’d i do? #diyjewlery #walkerartcenter
  • The stag is the king of the forest, the protector of all other creatures. For the native tribes of north america, the deer was a messanger, an animal of power, intuition and gentleness... and in buddhism, the deer symbolizes, harmony, happiness, peace and longevity. I tried to recreate the king stag necklace pendant on etsy using wire and an old clip-on earring, how’d i do? #diyjewlery #walkerartcenter

  •  38  5  15 November, 2019
  • Jefferson Circus Songs. Suzan Pitt. 1973.

Based solely on its exclusion from her website’s filmography, I consider Jefferson Circus Songs the rarest of the seven shorts compiled for the current online retrospective. Knowing nothing about it before it began, I was both shocked and pleasantly surprised to find that it blends animation with live action. She collaborated with the Walker Art Center and Jeferson High School in Minneapolis in order to stage a surreal circus. There’s not much information available online, but it appears to have been created while school was out for the summer. It is probably the most impressive thing I’ve seen produced by a public school and certainly stands as proof that fascinating art can blossom wherever it is incubated. 
1973 appears to have been a pivotal year for Pitt. She also produced a brief animated commercial for the Whitney Museum’s New American Filmmakers Series. It is available on YouTube.Perhaps that is how she secured the financing for Asparagus. She spent the next six years working on her most famous film. It was eventually paired with Eraserhead and they played together for two years. She would not produce another film until the nineties. Based on scraps of information I cobbled together online, she spent the interim producing a pair of operas in Germany (The Magic Flute and The Damnation of Faust), painting both on canvas and on coats, and exploring Mexico and the Guatemalan jungles. The locations were the primary influences on her next two shorts, so expect to see still from them soon.
  • Jefferson Circus Songs. Suzan Pitt. 1973.

    Based solely on its exclusion from her website’s filmography, I consider Jefferson Circus Songs the rarest of the seven shorts compiled for the current online retrospective. Knowing nothing about it before it began, I was both shocked and pleasantly surprised to find that it blends animation with live action. She collaborated with the Walker Art Center and Jeferson High School in Minneapolis in order to stage a surreal circus. There’s not much information available online, but it appears to have been created while school was out for the summer. It is probably the most impressive thing I’ve seen produced by a public school and certainly stands as proof that fascinating art can blossom wherever it is incubated.
    1973 appears to have been a pivotal year for Pitt. She also produced a brief animated commercial for the Whitney Museum’s New American Filmmakers Series. It is available on YouTube.Perhaps that is how she secured the financing for Asparagus. She spent the next six years working on her most famous film. It was eventually paired with Eraserhead and they played together for two years. She would not produce another film until the nineties. Based on scraps of information I cobbled together online, she spent the interim producing a pair of operas in Germany (The Magic Flute and The Damnation of Faust), painting both on canvas and on coats, and exploring Mexico and the Guatemalan jungles. The locations were the primary influences on her next two shorts, so expect to see still from them soon.

  •  15  1  14 November, 2019
  • A solid 9/10 for cool art and 10/10 for sweet selfie opps, but a sad 0/10 for cat representation. #walkerartcenter
  • A solid 9/10 for cool art and 10/10 for sweet selfie opps, but a sad 0/10 for cat representation. #walkerartcenter

  •  63  1  13 November, 2019
  • Hanging with my daughter/co-conspirator, Paige, in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden
at the Walker Art Center. #rockitportrait 🚀
  • Hanging with my daughter/co-conspirator, Paige, in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden
    at the Walker Art Center. #rockitportrait 🚀

  •  15  2  13 November, 2019
  • Very special seeing Edward Hopper’s “Office at Night” (1940) in person at @walkerartcenter. Afterward I felt compelled to revisit Olivia Laing’s “The Lonely City” where she writes poignantly about the intense urban alienation that emanates from Hopper’s work: “In painting after painting, he shows not just what loneliness looks like but also how it feels, communicating with his blank walls and open windows a simulacrum of its paranoid architecture, the way it functions to simultaneously entrap and expose...Where did it come from? What was Hopper’s own experience of cities, of intimacy, of longing? Was he lonely? Who do you have to be to see the world like that?”
  • Very special seeing Edward Hopper’s “Office at Night” (1940) in person at @walkerartcenter. Afterward I felt compelled to revisit Olivia Laing’s “The Lonely City” where she writes poignantly about the intense urban alienation that emanates from Hopper’s work: “In painting after painting, he shows not just what loneliness looks like but also how it feels, communicating with his blank walls and open windows a simulacrum of its paranoid architecture, the way it functions to simultaneously entrap and expose...Where did it come from? What was Hopper’s own experience of cities, of intimacy, of longing? Was he lonely? Who do you have to be to see the world like that?”

  •  165  1  11 November, 2019
  • Only 1 left! Straight from our archives, never to be released again.

Here's your last chance to own an original, hand finished work by acclaimed Los Angeles- based artist @jessedraxler 'Not Close Enough' signed by the artist en verso
20 × 16 in (50.8 × 40.6 cm)
  • Only 1 left! Straight from our archives, never to be released again.

    Here's your last chance to own an original, hand finished work by acclaimed Los Angeles- based artist @jessedraxler 'Not Close Enough' signed by the artist en verso
    20 × 16 in (50.8 × 40.6 cm)

  •  93  1  10 November, 2019
  • Barnett Newman’s “Untitled (No. 1),” 1950, in the Vincent James Associates-designed home of Ken and Judy Dayton. Ken Dayton was one of five brothers  to be active in the family business, Dayton Hudson (now Target Corporation). He and his wife built a small collection that includes works by Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Kenneth Noland. The Dayton’s major Newman, “The Third,”1962, was given to the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis where the couple was actively involved. His brother, Bruce Dayton, was also a major collector who left his collection, which ranges from Old Master to Mondrian, to the Minneapolis Institute of Art. #livingwithart #barnettnewman #artinthehome #abstractexpressionism #walkerartcenter #minneapolisinstituteofart #vjaa #vjaarchitects
  • Barnett Newman’s “Untitled (No. 1),” 1950, in the Vincent James Associates-designed home of Ken and Judy Dayton. Ken Dayton was one of five brothers to be active in the family business, Dayton Hudson (now Target Corporation). He and his wife built a small collection that includes works by Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Kenneth Noland. The Dayton’s major Newman, “The Third,”1962, was given to the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis where the couple was actively involved. His brother, Bruce Dayton, was also a major collector who left his collection, which ranges from Old Master to Mondrian, to the Minneapolis Institute of Art. #livingwithart #barnettnewman #artinthehome #abstractexpressionism #walkerartcenter #minneapolisinstituteofart #vjaa #vjaarchitects

  •  166  2  9 November, 2019
  • Mom and son day date featuring the many personalities of a 9 year old boy, lemonade and fortune tellers. @walkerartcenter
  • Mom and son day date featuring the many personalities of a 9 year old boy, lemonade and fortune tellers. @walkerartcenter

  •  74  1  9 November, 2019
  • אור, צל וכל החיים והמוות שבין לבין. 
יום אחד קטן בירושלים.

Kinds of selfies.
  • אור, צל וכל החיים והמוות שבין לבין.
    יום אחד קטן בירושלים.

    Kinds of selfies.

  •  157  9  8 November, 2019
  • Part 1/2 of the #walkerartcenter trip was a blast! Us visual arts kids thoroughly enjoyed the tour (shout-out to our tour guide Billy 👌🏼) and managed to brave through the cold and into the sculpture garden. Get ready for a fantastic time tomorrow, media majors. Thanks for the photo, @stitches.cosplay #pimartshs
  • Part 1/2 of the #walkerartcenter trip was a blast! Us visual arts kids thoroughly enjoyed the tour (shout-out to our tour guide Billy 👌🏼) and managed to brave through the cold and into the sculpture garden. Get ready for a fantastic time tomorrow, media majors. Thanks for the photo, @stitches.cosplay #pimartshs

  •  119  0  7 November, 2019
  • Lauren and that gorgeous smile! //
  • Lauren and that gorgeous smile! //

  •  27  4  7 November, 2019
  • Howdy everybody! My name is Kenna, and today I’ll be taking over the “pimstagram” page for the visual half of the #WalkerArtCenter field trip! I am a senior visual arts major, and although it’s only my second year at PiM, I’m really excited to be representing vis kids today! See you soon, Minneapolis.
  • Howdy everybody! My name is Kenna, and today I’ll be taking over the “pimstagram” page for the visual half of the #WalkerArtCenter field trip! I am a senior visual arts major, and although it’s only my second year at PiM, I’m really excited to be representing vis kids today! See you soon, Minneapolis.

  •  134  0  7 November, 2019

Top #walkerartcenter Posts

  • Stop by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis to see “Theaster Gates: Assembly Hall,” currently on view!

This exhibition brings a number of Gates’s collections into a museum context for the first time. The Walker’s galleries transpose the artist’s vast collections and studio environment into four immersive rooms, each infused with his own poetic intervention. Learn more via the link in our bio!
__________
#TheasterGates #WalkerArtCenter #Gagosian @walkerartcenter @theastergates
Installation views, “Theaster Gates: Assembly Hall,” September 5, 2019–January 12, 2020. Artwork © Theaster Gates. Photos: Bobby Roger
  • Stop by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis to see “Theaster Gates: Assembly Hall,” currently on view!

    This exhibition brings a number of Gates’s collections into a museum context for the first time. The Walker’s galleries transpose the artist’s vast collections and studio environment into four immersive rooms, each infused with his own poetic intervention. Learn more via the link in our bio!
    __________
    #TheasterGates #WalkerArtCenter #Gagosian @walkerartcenter @theastergates
    Installation views, “Theaster Gates: Assembly Hall,” September 5, 2019–January 12, 2020. Artwork © Theaster Gates. Photos: Bobby Roger

  •  2,679  24  18 hours ago
  • I’m feeling a cherry on top kinda day today 🍒🍒
.
.
.
📸 @manoftzeel
  • I’m feeling a cherry on top kinda day today 🍒🍒
    .
    .
    .
    📸 @manoftzeel

  •  568  182  23 September, 2019
  • /////// There are spaces all over the world like Chisenhale Gallery, and they have an important role based on experimentation and supporting those who can bring new perspectives to bear on the world. Art galleries and public institutions such as these are places in which it is possible to ask questions and debate outside the bounds of market-driven imperatives. The activity they produce is itself producing a form of knowledge: a network of relations and community of ideas. /// I’m currently thinking a lot about institution building as community building. What kinds of spaces do these institutions create, and who are they responsible for? To whom does the institution belong, to whom do they give a platform, and which voices are being excluded? To what notions of the collective or individual body do these institutions cater? Also, crucially, how can these institutions continue to survive? How can we be free to support artists making experimental and sometimes difficult work? And how do you retain an idea of public investment in these conservative times? /////// Thank you Anne Doran and ‘Art in America’ for the interview discussing 'Value' published this month in August's print issue and online within their annual 'Art Guide: Director Spotlights' feature. Chisenhale Gallery keeping good company alongside interviews with the team of directors at Human Resources, Los Angeles on 'Inclusivity'; Mary Ceruti director of the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis on 'Education' and Mélanie Bouteloup, director of Bétonsalon Centre d’art et de recherché, Paris on ‘Hybrid Spaces’. /////// https://www.artguide.pro/voices/director-spotlight-polly-staple-chisenhale-gallery-london-on-value/ 
#chisenhalegallery #artinamerica #humanresources #maryceruti #walkerartcenter #melaniebouteloup #betonsalon @chisenhalegallery @artinamerica @humanresourcesla @walkerartcenter @betonsalon pic by Mark Blower @markblower.photography
  • /////// There are spaces all over the world like Chisenhale Gallery, and they have an important role based on experimentation and supporting those who can bring new perspectives to bear on the world. Art galleries and public institutions such as these are places in which it is possible to ask questions and debate outside the bounds of market-driven imperatives. The activity they produce is itself producing a form of knowledge: a network of relations and community of ideas. /// I’m currently thinking a lot about institution building as community building. What kinds of spaces do these institutions create, and who are they responsible for? To whom does the institution belong, to whom do they give a platform, and which voices are being excluded? To what notions of the collective or individual body do these institutions cater? Also, crucially, how can these institutions continue to survive? How can we be free to support artists making experimental and sometimes difficult work? And how do you retain an idea of public investment in these conservative times? /////// Thank you Anne Doran and ‘Art in America’ for the interview discussing 'Value' published this month in August's print issue and online within their annual 'Art Guide: Director Spotlights' feature. Chisenhale Gallery keeping good company alongside interviews with the team of directors at Human Resources, Los Angeles on 'Inclusivity'; Mary Ceruti director of the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis on 'Education' and Mélanie Bouteloup, director of Bétonsalon Centre d’art et de recherché, Paris on ‘Hybrid Spaces’. /////// https://www.artguide.pro/voices/director-spotlight-polly-staple-chisenhale-gallery-london-on-value/
    #chisenhalegallery #artinamerica #humanresources #maryceruti #walkerartcenter #melaniebouteloup #betonsalon @chisenhalegallery @artinamerica @humanresourcesla @walkerartcenter @betonsalon pic by Mark Blower @markblower.photography

  •  1,168  54  12 August, 2019
  • Instead of delicately hued flowers and landscapes of New Mexico, Georgia O’Keeffe's early work was inspired by cityscapes and the rural environment of Lake George, New York, which she visited annually.⁠
⁠
Of an old barn on the Lake George property, she wrote: You could see it from the kitchen window or from the window of Stieglitz’s sitting room. With much effort I painted a picture of the front part of the barn. I had never painted anything like that before. After that I painted the side where all the paint was gone with south wind. It was weathered gray—with one broken pane in the small window.⁠
⁠
The barn motif, to which O’Keeffe would return often, also invokes her childhood farm home in Wisconsin, where she was born, #onthisday in 1887.⁠
⁠
Today we celebrate her legacy!⁠
—⁠
⁠
See this work in the exhibition "Five Ways In: Themes From the Collection." [Detail #GeorgiaOKeeffe, "Lake George Barns" (1926)] Collection #WalkerArtCenter⁠
⁠
  • Instead of delicately hued flowers and landscapes of New Mexico, Georgia O’Keeffe's early work was inspired by cityscapes and the rural environment of Lake George, New York, which she visited annually.⁠

    Of an old barn on the Lake George property, she wrote: You could see it from the kitchen window or from the window of Stieglitz’s sitting room. With much effort I painted a picture of the front part of the barn. I had never painted anything like that before. After that I painted the side where all the paint was gone with south wind. It was weathered gray—with one broken pane in the small window.⁠

    The barn motif, to which O’Keeffe would return often, also invokes her childhood farm home in Wisconsin, where she was born, #onthisday in 1887.⁠

    Today we celebrate her legacy!⁠
    —⁠

    See this work in the exhibition "Five Ways In: Themes From the Collection." [Detail #GeorgiaOKeeffe, "Lake George Barns" (1926)] Collection #WalkerArtCenter

  •  898  15  15 November, 2019