#troutfishing Instagram Photos & Videos

troutfishing - 972.7k posts

Latest #troutfishing Posts

Advertisements

Advertisements

  • Hard to beat a day like today!
  • Hard to beat a day like today!
  •  15  1  17 hours ago

Advertisements

  • Beautiful Brookie in my own back yard! 🤫👌🏼🎣
  • Beautiful Brookie in my own back yard! 🤫👌🏼🎣
  •  12  5  17 hours ago
  • Way before I became myself 
I’d like to thank myself, because I made myself the man
It’s like lately I ain’t myself 
I’d rather hang myself before I play myself 
I tell her “throw on the dress wit the pinstripes”
Know the one that fit the booty all skin tight that’s right
  • Way before I became myself
    I’d like to thank myself, because I made myself the man
    It’s like lately I ain’t myself
    I’d rather hang myself before I play myself
    I tell her “throw on the dress wit the pinstripes”
    Know the one that fit the booty all skin tight that’s right
  •  117  3  18 hours ago
  • Jungle hook-ups🌴
  • Jungle hook-ups🌴
  •  49  5  18 hours ago
  • Bugged Out
  • Bugged Out
  •  42  2  18 hours ago
  • Kyped up looper from my last adventure up the Shore! I've caught way more loopers in the rivers this year than the last few.
  • Kyped up looper from my last adventure up the Shore! I've caught way more loopers in the rivers this year than the last few.
  •  45  1  18 hours ago

Top #troutfishing Posts

  • Want to complete the Western Native Trout Challenge, but don't know where to start? Need to find awesome fish like this Apache Trout in Arizona?  Sign up for our Chasing Native Trout e newsletters on westernnativetrout.org great #matchthehat photo from today by @nathansidoti #westernnativetroutchallenge
  • Want to complete the Western Native Trout Challenge, but don't know where to start? Need to find awesome fish like this Apache Trout in Arizona? Sign up for our Chasing Native Trout e newsletters on westernnativetrout.org great #matchthehat photo from today by @nathansidoti #westernnativetroutchallenge
  •  586  3  23 hours ago

Advertisements

  • .
ACHIEVING DEPTH: GIVE IT A ‘SHOT
.
.
One of the most important lessons that all fly anglers learn at some point or another is that the depth of your presentation matters just as much, if not more, than the presentation itself. You can achieve the most natural drag-free drift imaginable, but if it’s floating two feet above a fish that doesn’t feel like moving, you’re going to be met with disappointment. This is why we add weight. .
.
Before diving into this topic, I’ll preface it by saying that adding weight isn’t the ONLY way to achieve depth (smaller tippet, longer leader, sink tip line, etc, etc.), but it certainly is an effective one. .
.
Perhaps I was naive, but for some reason, I overlooked the importance of splitshot as a tool when I first got into fly fishing. I figured, if I need to get deep, I can use a beadhead, a smaller tippet, sink tip line, and all the other mechanisms that allow you to squeeze out a bit more depth to your drift. While this was true, adding splitshot is a quick and easy way to adjust your depth, and if you’re fishing varying depths, the ability to adjust with removable ‘shot is a lot faster than tying on an entirely new leader or tippet. When the water is fast, sometimes a simple bead head isn’t enough, and you’ll need something else to get that extra kick. .
.
There is such a thing as “too much” when it comes to splitshot, as it can be quite visible, affect the movement of your fly, and hamper your casting. But how much is too much? .
.
Ideally, you want to use as little splitshot as you can to get your fly where it needs to be. It’s easier for a fish to move up slightly to intercept your fly than it is to rummage on the bottom, so if you find yourself dragging the bottom consistently, try losing a bit of weight. If you’re drifting and NEVER ticking the bottom, experiment with a little added weight. In most situations, you want your fly right in the “sweet spot” right around or slightly above eye level for a fish on the bottom. As you gain experience, you’ll be able to make an educated guess as to how much to add. If you guess wrong, just adjust until you’ve  fine-tuned it to the desired depth. .
.
.
📷 @browntroutben
  • .
    ACHIEVING DEPTH: GIVE IT A ‘SHOT
    .
    .
    One of the most important lessons that all fly anglers learn at some point or another is that the depth of your presentation matters just as much, if not more, than the presentation itself. You can achieve the most natural drag-free drift imaginable, but if it’s floating two feet above a fish that doesn’t feel like moving, you’re going to be met with disappointment. This is why we add weight. .
    .
    Before diving into this topic, I’ll preface it by saying that adding weight isn’t the ONLY way to achieve depth (smaller tippet, longer leader, sink tip line, etc, etc.), but it certainly is an effective one. .
    .
    Perhaps I was naive, but for some reason, I overlooked the importance of splitshot as a tool when I first got into fly fishing. I figured, if I need to get deep, I can use a beadhead, a smaller tippet, sink tip line, and all the other mechanisms that allow you to squeeze out a bit more depth to your drift. While this was true, adding splitshot is a quick and easy way to adjust your depth, and if you’re fishing varying depths, the ability to adjust with removable ‘shot is a lot faster than tying on an entirely new leader or tippet. When the water is fast, sometimes a simple bead head isn’t enough, and you’ll need something else to get that extra kick. .
    .
    There is such a thing as “too much” when it comes to splitshot, as it can be quite visible, affect the movement of your fly, and hamper your casting. But how much is too much? .
    .
    Ideally, you want to use as little splitshot as you can to get your fly where it needs to be. It’s easier for a fish to move up slightly to intercept your fly than it is to rummage on the bottom, so if you find yourself dragging the bottom consistently, try losing a bit of weight. If you’re drifting and NEVER ticking the bottom, experiment with a little added weight. In most situations, you want your fly right in the “sweet spot” right around or slightly above eye level for a fish on the bottom. As you gain experience, you’ll be able to make an educated guess as to how much to add. If you guess wrong, just adjust until you’ve fine-tuned it to the desired depth. .
    .
    .
    📷 @browntroutben
  •  804  8  21 May, 2019

Advertisements