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  • Study days are the best because I get to have earphones all day 👌

I don't know why it has taken me so long to listen to @frankturner's podcast but wow, I recommend it to everyone!

I can never sit and listen to radio or podcasts because I find them boring and my attention goes elsewhere. But listening to the tales of historical women that Frank Turner has wrote songs about is something else 😍

3 podcasts in before I realised it was lunch time 😅 honestly can't reccomend it enough! You learn so much.
•
•
#frankturner #nomansland #frankturnernomansland #podcast #talesofnomansland #studyday #inspiration #history #historicalwomen
  • Study days are the best because I get to have earphones all day 👌

    I don't know why it has taken me so long to listen to @frankturner's podcast but wow, I recommend it to everyone!

    I can never sit and listen to radio or podcasts because I find them boring and my attention goes elsewhere. But listening to the tales of historical women that Frank Turner has wrote songs about is something else 😍

    3 podcasts in before I realised it was lunch time 😅 honestly can't reccomend it enough! You learn so much.


    #frankturner #nomansland #frankturnernomansland #podcast #talesofnomansland #studyday #inspiration #history #historicalwomen

  •  3  0  4 hours ago
  • ¿Obsesión o falta de tiempo? (Corrigiendo mientras espero al chiquito, a que salga de su clase)
  • ¿Obsesión o falta de tiempo? (Corrigiendo mientras espero al chiquito, a que salga de su clase)

  •  15  1  12 December, 2019
  • Heyooo!!👋🏽👋🏽 Happiest of hump days to ya! ⁠
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It’s time to reveal our other new Wednesday goodie: the 2nd Wednesday of the month shall henceforth be #werememberwednesday, here at @goddesste_ 🙌🏼💃🏻⁠
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This will be a day for us to feature & celebrate women in a different kind of way! While we LOVE (like whoa) celebrating all you goddesses who are movin’ & shakin’ in today’s world 🌍, we feel it’s super important to remember the amazing women who came before us, who paved the way to all things goddess for the generations to follow!💪 ⁠
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It takes a strong spirit & a golden heart to care enough to insist on creating change, & then having the strength to endure & see it through! ❤️✊🏼✌🏽We want to honor the women who have done exactly that - we can only hope to make some sort of historical impact that will truly HELP the generations of women who are coming behind us! 🙏🏽⁠
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*⁠
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Ready for more excitement?💥 While we are for sure going to be picking these features ourselves, we are opening this baby up for nominations!🎉 Got a woman from history whom you admire, maybe even worship a wee bit? Nominate her!! Make a post using the hashtag #werememberwednesday, & be sure to tag us so we see it! ⁠
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Now, let’s get 👏🏼 to 👏🏼 work 👏🏼 - lots of ladies worthy of being remembered! We love y’all!! ⁠
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#goddesste #everydayisgoddesste #historicalwomen #womenwelove #womenweadmire #femaleentrepreneurs #femaleleaders #inspiration #helenkeller
  • Heyooo!!👋🏽👋🏽 Happiest of hump days to ya! ⁠

    *⁠

    It’s time to reveal our other new Wednesday goodie: the 2nd Wednesday of the month shall henceforth be #werememberwednesday, here at @goddesste_ 🙌🏼💃🏻⁠

    *⁠

    This will be a day for us to feature & celebrate women in a different kind of way! While we LOVE (like whoa) celebrating all you goddesses who are movin’ & shakin’ in today’s world 🌍, we feel it’s super important to remember the amazing women who came before us, who paved the way to all things goddess for the generations to follow!💪 ⁠

    *⁠

    It takes a strong spirit & a golden heart to care enough to insist on creating change, & then having the strength to endure & see it through! ❤️✊🏼✌🏽We want to honor the women who have done exactly that - we can only hope to make some sort of historical impact that will truly HELP the generations of women who are coming behind us! 🙏🏽⁠

    *⁠

    Ready for more excitement?💥 While we are for sure going to be picking these features ourselves, we are opening this baby up for nominations!🎉 Got a woman from history whom you admire, maybe even worship a wee bit? Nominate her!! Make a post using the hashtag #werememberwednesday, & be sure to tag us so we see it! ⁠

    *⁠

    Now, let’s get 👏🏼 to 👏🏼 work 👏🏼 - lots of ladies worthy of being remembered! We love y’all!! ⁠

    *⁠

    #goddesste #everydayisgoddesste #historicalwomen #womenwelove #womenweadmire #femaleentrepreneurs #femaleleaders #inspiration #helenkeller

  •  18  2  12 December, 2019
  • Welcome to another #HistoricalWomenWednesday! Today we are shining light on Sojourner Truth!•
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In New York, Sojourner Truth escaped slavery with her child after her previous master did not comply with the New York Anti-Slavery Law of 1827. She soon became a major voice in activism revolving racism, women’s rights, emancipation and more! She gained such a following by having a powerful voice that stopped people in their tracks to listen. One of her most famous speeches is titled “Ain’t I A Woman?” speaking about woman’s rights in particular. Truth paved a way for minorities to be heard and spoke reason into granting rights to everyone, no matter their skin color or gender. 
Source: National Park Service•
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What woman should we discuss next? Feel free to DM us stories of historical women! Happy Wednesday! •
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#history #chicostate #historicalwomen #sojournertruth #socialactivism #historicalstories #americanhistory
  • Welcome to another #HistoricalWomenWednesday! Today we are shining light on Sojourner Truth!•
    -

    In New York, Sojourner Truth escaped slavery with her child after her previous master did not comply with the New York Anti-Slavery Law of 1827. She soon became a major voice in activism revolving racism, women’s rights, emancipation and more! She gained such a following by having a powerful voice that stopped people in their tracks to listen. One of her most famous speeches is titled “Ain’t I A Woman?” speaking about woman’s rights in particular. Truth paved a way for minorities to be heard and spoke reason into granting rights to everyone, no matter their skin color or gender.
    Source: National Park Service•
    -

    What woman should we discuss next? Feel free to DM us stories of historical women! Happy Wednesday! •
    -
    #history #chicostate #historicalwomen #sojournertruth #socialactivism #historicalstories #americanhistory

  •  17  0  11 December, 2019
  • El Vikingo se espantó al ver esta página. Yo le dije que era una página buena, que no existen las páginas limpias en el borrador, ¿verdad? 
Entre más corregida, ¡mejor!
  • El Vikingo se espantó al ver esta página. Yo le dije que era una página buena, que no existen las páginas limpias en el borrador, ¿verdad?
    Entre más corregida, ¡mejor!

  •  32  1  11 December, 2019
  • Who doesn’t love bubble or just to be clear, who doesn’t love Champagne and Sparkling wine?
I know I do!
Today I’m going to explain the origin of my favorite Champagne: Veuve Clicquot.
Her name was Barbe Nicole Clicquot, Born Ponsardin.
She wasn’t even born when Philippe Clicquot-Muiron, her soon to be father-in-law, funded the House of Champagne Clicquot in 1772. 
Philippe was a banker and a textile marchant. He was the owner of a vineyard in Reims and while he kept the textile company, he decided to start in the wine business.
Another successful man in the textile business was Nicolas Ponsardin. To create a partnership and to join power between the 2 businesses, both men arranged a wedding between their children: Francois Clicquot & Barbe Ponsardin, they got married in 1798. So for now, the company is named Clicquot-Muiron & fils.
Philippe  retired in 1801 and 4years later, Francois died from typhoid at the age of 30. His father wanted to get rid of the company both The 27years old widow decided to take over, Naming the Company: Veuve Clicquot. (Veuve meaning ‘’Widow’’ in French)
Nicknamed « La grande Dame du Champagne", she became the first woman to run a champagne house and one of the first business women of the modern era.
She sent her champagne into royal court of Europe, mostly Russia, so all the continent can know her product. She established the champagne as the favorite drink for royalty.
She ran the successful company during the Napoleonic War and today, the company produce more then 2,000 000 bottles a year.
Barbe Clicquot died in 1866, she’s buried in the Cimetiere du Nord in Reims.
To honor her, in 1972, an award is created to honor outstanding business women for their entrepreneurial spirit, it’s called The Veuve-Clicquot Award.

If you liked my post, feel free to leave a comment bellow or share it. 
And don’t forget to follow my account if you want to learn more about history.

#veuveclicquot #clicquot #reims #reimsfrance #champagne #champagnelover #vineyard #drink #bubble #widow #businesswoman #history #instafrance #instachampagne #instahistory #historyfacts #historylover #instagay #drinkchampagne #champagnelife #instareims #france
  • Who doesn’t love bubble or just to be clear, who doesn’t love Champagne and Sparkling wine?
    I know I do!
    Today I’m going to explain the origin of my favorite Champagne: Veuve Clicquot.
    Her name was Barbe Nicole Clicquot, Born Ponsardin.
    She wasn’t even born when Philippe Clicquot-Muiron, her soon to be father-in-law, funded the House of Champagne Clicquot in 1772.
    Philippe was a banker and a textile marchant. He was the owner of a vineyard in Reims and while he kept the textile company, he decided to start in the wine business.
    Another successful man in the textile business was Nicolas Ponsardin. To create a partnership and to join power between the 2 businesses, both men arranged a wedding between their children: Francois Clicquot & Barbe Ponsardin, they got married in 1798. So for now, the company is named Clicquot-Muiron & fils.
    Philippe retired in 1801 and 4years later, Francois died from typhoid at the age of 30. His father wanted to get rid of the company both The 27years old widow decided to take over, Naming the Company: Veuve Clicquot. (Veuve meaning ‘’Widow’’ in French)
    Nicknamed « La grande Dame du Champagne", she became the first woman to run a champagne house and one of the first business women of the modern era.
    She sent her champagne into royal court of Europe, mostly Russia, so all the continent can know her product. She established the champagne as the favorite drink for royalty.
    She ran the successful company during the Napoleonic War and today, the company produce more then 2,000 000 bottles a year.
    Barbe Clicquot died in 1866, she’s buried in the Cimetiere du Nord in Reims.
    To honor her, in 1972, an award is created to honor outstanding business women for their entrepreneurial spirit, it’s called The Veuve-Clicquot Award.

    If you liked my post, feel free to leave a comment bellow or share it.
    And don’t forget to follow my account if you want to learn more about history.

    #veuveclicquot #clicquot #reims #reimsfrance #champagne #champagnelover #vineyard #drink #bubble #widow #businesswoman #history #instafrance #instachampagne #instahistory #historyfacts #historylover #instagay #drinkchampagne #champagnelife #instareims #france

  •  75  12  11 December, 2019
  • #royaltyincolour Prince Gaston d’ Orléans, Count of Eu and Prince Imperial Consort of Brazil, colorized photograph c. 1882
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Prince Gaston of Orleans, Count of Eu (28 April 1842 – 28 August 1922) was the first son of Louis, Duke of Nemours, and Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha-Kohary, was a French prince and military commander who fought in the Spanish-Moroccan War and the Paraguayan War. At the age of 5 he fled with his family to England after his grandfather, King Louis-Phillipe of the French was forced to abdicate in 1848. He received a robust education and spoke many foreign languages.
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At the age of 13, he entered military training in Segovia, Spain. He was later sent to serve in the Spanish-Moroccan war. The Spanish were heavily outmatched, but the Prince participated in every single battle, and returned to Europe with a reputation of military prowess. A few years later, his uncle, King Ferdinand II of Portugal proposed that he should marry one of the two daughters of the Emperor Pedro II of Brazil. The Emperor's sister, Princess Francisca, who was married to the Count's uncle, the Prince of Joinville, wrote a letter to her brother describing the Count. "If you could grab this one for one of your daughters it would be excellent. He is robust, high, handsome, good natured, very amiable, much instructed, studious, and in addition, he possesses now a small military fame."
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He was not attracted to either of the princesses, but later got to know and became very attached to the elder Princess Isabel of Brazil, the eventual heir to the throne. They married and we’re devoted to each other for the rest of their lives. During their honeymoon, the western provinces of Brazil were invaded by Paraguay, and Prince Gaston was ordered to return to Brazil to serve as commander in the war. In the opinion of the Viscount of Taunay, Gaston showed "great strategical ability, cool temper, patience of an experienced leader and unquestionable courage."
•
Following his marriage to Isabel, Gaston participated actively in the Brazilian government, making commentaries and offering advice about the development of the country.
•
Continued in the Comments
  • #royaltyincolour Prince Gaston d’ Orléans, Count of Eu and Prince Imperial Consort of Brazil, colorized photograph c. 1882

    Prince Gaston of Orleans, Count of Eu (28 April 1842 – 28 August 1922) was the first son of Louis, Duke of Nemours, and Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha-Kohary, was a French prince and military commander who fought in the Spanish-Moroccan War and the Paraguayan War. At the age of 5 he fled with his family to England after his grandfather, King Louis-Phillipe of the French was forced to abdicate in 1848. He received a robust education and spoke many foreign languages.

    At the age of 13, he entered military training in Segovia, Spain. He was later sent to serve in the Spanish-Moroccan war. The Spanish were heavily outmatched, but the Prince participated in every single battle, and returned to Europe with a reputation of military prowess. A few years later, his uncle, King Ferdinand II of Portugal proposed that he should marry one of the two daughters of the Emperor Pedro II of Brazil. The Emperor's sister, Princess Francisca, who was married to the Count's uncle, the Prince of Joinville, wrote a letter to her brother describing the Count. "If you could grab this one for one of your daughters it would be excellent. He is robust, high, handsome, good natured, very amiable, much instructed, studious, and in addition, he possesses now a small military fame."

    He was not attracted to either of the princesses, but later got to know and became very attached to the elder Princess Isabel of Brazil, the eventual heir to the throne. They married and we’re devoted to each other for the rest of their lives. During their honeymoon, the western provinces of Brazil were invaded by Paraguay, and Prince Gaston was ordered to return to Brazil to serve as commander in the war. In the opinion of the Viscount of Taunay, Gaston showed "great strategical ability, cool temper, patience of an experienced leader and unquestionable courage."

    Following his marriage to Isabel, Gaston participated actively in the Brazilian government, making commentaries and offering advice about the development of the country.

    Continued in the Comments

  •  901  13  10 December, 2019
  • FEMALE REVOLUTIONARIES: NADEZHDA KRUPSKAYA // If Vladimir Lenin was the father of the Russian Revolution, Nadezhda Krupskaya was the mother. That’s not only because she was married to the Bolshevik leader, although it sort of fits. 
Krupskaya also fought for education all her life. She taught basic literacy and numeracy classes to Russian factory workers illegally, in secret night school classes. Later, she openly opposed and worked against Stalin, who in turn barred her name from being mentioned in the media.

#TheRebelChronicles #femalerevolutionaries #revolutionaries #revolutionary #russianwoman #russianrevolution
  • FEMALE REVOLUTIONARIES: NADEZHDA KRUPSKAYA // If Vladimir Lenin was the father of the Russian Revolution, Nadezhda Krupskaya was the mother. That’s not only because she was married to the Bolshevik leader, although it sort of fits.
    Krupskaya also fought for education all her life. She taught basic literacy and numeracy classes to Russian factory workers illegally, in secret night school classes. Later, she openly opposed and worked against Stalin, who in turn barred her name from being mentioned in the media.

    #TheRebelChronicles #femalerevolutionaries #revolutionaries #revolutionary #russianwoman #russianrevolution

  •  92  33  10 December, 2019
  • Las Mujeres de la Guerra
Ediciones B, Penguin Random House Chile.
Novela histórica
Publicada en mayo de 2019.
2 edición, junio de 2019.
Eventos, entrevistas, fotos de lectores, reseñas.
  • Las Mujeres de la Guerra
    Ediciones B, Penguin Random House Chile.
    Novela histórica
    Publicada en mayo de 2019.
    2 edición, junio de 2019.
    Eventos, entrevistas, fotos de lectores, reseñas.

  •  17  1  10 December, 2019
  • “If you could invite anyone to your birthday party, who would that be?” An intriguing question in a Chick-fil-A kids game I recently played. 
I had a list, all women from history: Abigail Adams, Sojourner Truth, Corrie ten Boom, Mary McLeod Bethune, Jacqueline Cochran. I could have named a lot more, but my grandson was getting bored with my response. 
I realized that so many great women had inspired me. Yet, looking at their lives, I think they would have been surprised that the waves they created transcended time. 
It’s no different today if we follow our purpose, our passion. If we do what we were created to do, we will have an impact too. Whether it is our family, friends, community, or even history, remember this, each of our lives can and will inspire others. .
.
.
.
.
.

#womenofhistory #historicalwomen #gritandgrace #gritandgracelife #gritandgracewomen #darlenebrock #birthday #birthdayparty #womentoadmire #inspire #inspireothers #inspirational
  • “If you could invite anyone to your birthday party, who would that be?” An intriguing question in a Chick-fil-A kids game I recently played.
    I had a list, all women from history: Abigail Adams, Sojourner Truth, Corrie ten Boom, Mary McLeod Bethune, Jacqueline Cochran. I could have named a lot more, but my grandson was getting bored with my response.
    I realized that so many great women had inspired me. Yet, looking at their lives, I think they would have been surprised that the waves they created transcended time.
    It’s no different today if we follow our purpose, our passion. If we do what we were created to do, we will have an impact too. Whether it is our family, friends, community, or even history, remember this, each of our lives can and will inspire others. .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .

    #womenofhistory #historicalwomen #gritandgrace #gritandgracelife #gritandgracewomen #darlenebrock #birthday #birthdayparty #womentoadmire #inspire #inspireothers #inspirational

  •  34  5  9 December, 2019
  • “No hay necesidad de apurarse. No hay necesidad de brillar. No es necesario ser nadie más que uno mismo.”
-Virginia Woolf
  • “No hay necesidad de apurarse. No hay necesidad de brillar. No es necesario ser nadie más que uno mismo.”
    -Virginia Woolf

  •  49  3  9 December, 2019
  • Joyce Chen is an inspiring Chinese American Woman entrepreneur. After leaving Shanghai in 1949, Joyce began her Chinese food legacy in the United States. She is credited to spreading Chinese food to the Western world during the mid to late 20th century through teaching others how to cook, opening several restaurants, writing several cookbooks, having her own  television program "Joyce Chen Cooks," and held paten to a flat bottom wok.
  • Joyce Chen is an inspiring Chinese American Woman entrepreneur. After leaving Shanghai in 1949, Joyce began her Chinese food legacy in the United States. She is credited to spreading Chinese food to the Western world during the mid to late 20th century through teaching others how to cook, opening several restaurants, writing several cookbooks, having her own television program "Joyce Chen Cooks," and held paten to a flat bottom wok.

  •  50  1  9 December, 2019
  • Here is a look at our Harriet box! Inside you will find an activity journal, play it forward cards, a beautiful lantern necklace and a North Star charm 🌟. Also included is a personal letter from the founder, Heather Stark. The theme throughout is COURAGE! This is a wonderful way to join your girl in learning about such an important historical figure and theme. Visit us online or send a message! We’d love to help!  #harriettubman #courage #graceandgrit #graceandgritbox #gifts #giftideasforgirls #girlpower #historicalwomen
  • Here is a look at our Harriet box! Inside you will find an activity journal, play it forward cards, a beautiful lantern necklace and a North Star charm 🌟. Also included is a personal letter from the founder, Heather Stark. The theme throughout is COURAGE! This is a wonderful way to join your girl in learning about such an important historical figure and theme. Visit us online or send a message! We’d love to help! #harriettubman #courage #graceandgrit #graceandgritbox #gifts #giftideasforgirls #girlpower #historicalwomen

  •  15  1  7 December, 2019
  • Lapicero rojo y almendras cubiertas en chocolate, no hay mejor receta para un día de correcciones.
  • Lapicero rojo y almendras cubiertas en chocolate, no hay mejor receta para un día de correcciones.

  •  30  1  7 December, 2019
  • 𝒞𝐼𝒩𝒬𝒰𝒜𝐼𝒩𝒮
𝐸𝓋𝒾𝓁
𝐵𝑒𝓌𝒶𝓇𝑒!
𝐼𝓉 𝓁𝓊𝓇𝓀𝓈 𝓈𝑜 𝓃𝑒𝒶𝓇,
𝒢𝓇𝑒𝑒𝓃 𝓈𝑒𝓇𝓅𝑒𝓃𝓉 𝑜𝒻 𝒻𝒾𝑒𝓇𝓎 𝒷𝓇𝑒𝒶𝓉𝒽,
𝒯𝒽𝒶𝓉 𝒹𝒾𝓈𝓉𝑜𝓇𝓉𝓈 𝓂𝑒𝓃’𝓈 𝓈𝑜𝓊𝓁𝓈, 𝓌𝒶𝓇𝓅𝓈 𝓂𝒾𝓃𝒹𝓈, ‘𝓉𝒾𝓈
𝒥𝑒𝒶𝓁𝑜𝓊𝓈𝓎.

𝒜𝓃𝓃𝑒 𝒮𝑒𝓍𝓉𝑜𝓃 🧿🧿
  • 𝒞𝐼𝒩𝒬𝒰𝒜𝐼𝒩𝒮
    𝐸𝓋𝒾𝓁
    𝐵𝑒𝓌𝒶𝓇𝑒!
    𝐼𝓉 𝓁𝓊𝓇𝓀𝓈 𝓈𝑜 𝓃𝑒𝒶𝓇,
    𝒢𝓇𝑒𝑒𝓃 𝓈𝑒𝓇𝓅𝑒𝓃𝓉 𝑜𝒻 𝒻𝒾𝑒𝓇𝓎 𝒷𝓇𝑒𝒶𝓉𝒽,
    𝒯𝒽𝒶𝓉 𝒹𝒾𝓈𝓉𝑜𝓇𝓉𝓈 𝓂𝑒𝓃’𝓈 𝓈𝑜𝓊𝓁𝓈, 𝓌𝒶𝓇𝓅𝓈 𝓂𝒾𝓃𝒹𝓈, ‘𝓉𝒾𝓈
    𝒥𝑒𝒶𝓁𝑜𝓊𝓈𝓎.

    𝒜𝓃𝓃𝑒 𝒮𝑒𝓍𝓉𝑜𝓃 🧿🧿

  •  17  1  7 December, 2019
  • I just want to take a minute to say how grateful I am to have had the chance to perform my play for incredible audiences throughout our run. It is truly a dream for any actor to be able to perform in packed houses to audience members who are rooting for you. Thanks so much to all my true supporters who came to see “Her Kind” (sometimes twice) and those who spread the word. And I’m so grateful to my incredible team: Director Carl Ford @cblackwaku , Assistant Director/Stage Manager Tanya Ruth @tanyaruthlife , Set Designer/Stage Manager Proverbs Taylor @illmaticscream_tvshow and Stage Managers Nicole Beninato @nicole_beninato_og and Chet van Stone (David). And finally my incredible supporter and teacher Susan Batson @susanbatsonstudio ! You are all so amazing!! Thank you! ❤️❤️❤️ 3 more shows to go this week! ☺️☺️ RSVP at herkindtheplay@gmail.com 
Photography by the amazing Ramy Mam. @ramyonsetphotos 
Set Design by the uber-talented Proverbs Taylor @illmaticscream_tvshow
  • I just want to take a minute to say how grateful I am to have had the chance to perform my play for incredible audiences throughout our run. It is truly a dream for any actor to be able to perform in packed houses to audience members who are rooting for you. Thanks so much to all my true supporters who came to see “Her Kind” (sometimes twice) and those who spread the word. And I’m so grateful to my incredible team: Director Carl Ford @cblackwaku , Assistant Director/Stage Manager Tanya Ruth @tanyaruthlife , Set Designer/Stage Manager Proverbs Taylor @illmaticscream_tvshow and Stage Managers Nicole Beninato @nicole_beninato_og and Chet van Stone (David). And finally my incredible supporter and teacher Susan Batson @susanbatsonstudio ! You are all so amazing!! Thank you! ❤️❤️❤️ 3 more shows to go this week! ☺️☺️ RSVP at herkindtheplay@gmail.com
    Photography by the amazing Ramy Mam. @ramyonsetphotos
    Set Design by the uber-talented Proverbs Taylor @illmaticscream_tvshow

  •  107  14  6 December, 2019

Top #historicalwomen Posts

  • The ancient world was a hard place for a woman, in Roman culture for example women had a few rights, they weren’t allowed any voice in terms of politics nor allowed to make or contribute to any ideas outside of the home, women were seen as the property of the men in their lives & had no role outside of Home management or childbearing. This wasn’t an unusual custom though & many cultures during the same period saw women in similar ways, however, the women of the Celtic culture were unique within the ancient world.

Although the Celts were still very much a patriarchal society, women were allowed substantially more freedom than women of other cultures, they had rights, were protected by law & held prominent positions within their society.  Historical accounts also remark on these women being fierce warriors who would fight alongside their men, the Roman historian Tacitus likened them to the mythical Furies & the Greek historian Diodorus Siculus remarked on how the women were a match for men in terms of stature & courage.  Aside from Celtic women being allowed to fight they were able to take on religious roles such as Druidesses, allowed to take part in politics & even allowed to rule.  Celtic legends are filled with stories of strong Celtic women ruling their clans, the most famous of all being Boudicca who, after the death of her husband, became the ruler of the Iceni tribe that lived in the East of Britain. 
But despite all the freedoms their society offered Celtic women but still seen as subordinate to the men in their lives, Julius Caesar wrote that the men held power of life or death over their women & multiple men could possess a woman until she was married.  But although in marriage the wife would be the lesser to the husband, she would still enjoy freedoms that weren’t awarded to women of other cultures, women were allowed to inherit wealth & property independently & in cases where a divorce had been granted women were allowed to leave the marriage with their original contribution & then allowed to remarry without being judged by the community.
  • The ancient world was a hard place for a woman, in Roman culture for example women had a few rights, they weren’t allowed any voice in terms of politics nor allowed to make or contribute to any ideas outside of the home, women were seen as the property of the men in their lives & had no role outside of Home management or childbearing. This wasn’t an unusual custom though & many cultures during the same period saw women in similar ways, however, the women of the Celtic culture were unique within the ancient world.

    Although the Celts were still very much a patriarchal society, women were allowed substantially more freedom than women of other cultures, they had rights, were protected by law & held prominent positions within their society. Historical accounts also remark on these women being fierce warriors who would fight alongside their men, the Roman historian Tacitus likened them to the mythical Furies & the Greek historian Diodorus Siculus remarked on how the women were a match for men in terms of stature & courage. Aside from Celtic women being allowed to fight they were able to take on religious roles such as Druidesses, allowed to take part in politics & even allowed to rule. Celtic legends are filled with stories of strong Celtic women ruling their clans, the most famous of all being Boudicca who, after the death of her husband, became the ruler of the Iceni tribe that lived in the East of Britain.
    But despite all the freedoms their society offered Celtic women but still seen as subordinate to the men in their lives, Julius Caesar wrote that the men held power of life or death over their women & multiple men could possess a woman until she was married. But although in marriage the wife would be the lesser to the husband, she would still enjoy freedoms that weren’t awarded to women of other cultures, women were allowed to inherit wealth & property independently & in cases where a divorce had been granted women were allowed to leave the marriage with their original contribution & then allowed to remarry without being judged by the community.

  •  755  30  21 November, 2019
  • Queen Zenobia's Last Look Upon Palmyra, by Herbert Gustave Schmalz (1888 CE). Original on exhibit, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide.
  • Queen Zenobia's Last Look Upon Palmyra, by Herbert Gustave Schmalz (1888 CE). Original on exhibit, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide.

  •  5,157  42  4 August, 2019
  • On this day in 548 CE: Empress Theodora I dies after suffering from an illness (suspected cancer).
  • On this day in 548 CE: Empress Theodora I dies after suffering from an illness (suspected cancer).

  •  1,738  18  28 June, 2019
  • Berenice (c. 267-221 BCE), the daughter of the Macedonian dynast Magas and his Seleucid wife Apame, was born in Cyrene, a Greek city in Libya. Ptolemy I had installed Magas, a son of his fourth wife Berenice I by a previous marriage, as governor of Cyrenaica (the northern coastal region of Libya). Magas eventually wrestled a measure of independence from Ptolemaic sovereignty but still had to acknowledge their suzerainty – and betrothed his daughter to the son and heir of Ptolemy II as a diplomatic and dynastic assurance. His half-Persian wife Apame was the daughter of Antiochus I and Stratonice.

After his death (c. 252/1 BCE), Magas’ widow married Berenice to the Macedonian prince Demetrius the Fair – who, however, offended the soldiers of the Cyrenean army and was assassinated in the bedroom of Apame. Whether this capture in flagrante delicto was a plot set up by Berenice in tandem with her mother or not remains a mystery. Cyrene briefly attempted to establish a republic (c. 250/49-249/8 BCE). After this interlude in Cyrene, Berenice realigned with Egypt and renewed her marital pledges to Ptolemy III. After the natural death of Ptolemy II (c. Jan 246 BCE), his son succeeded to the throne, Berenice joined him in Alexandria, and they officially wed. He was 37; she had just turned 20. About half a year later the Seleucid king Antiochus II died with the succession unclear – his two rivaling queens Laodice and Berenice (sister of Ptolemy III) proclaiming their respective sons as heir to the throne. •
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• (Article by Branko van Oppen || Photos belong to their respective owners)
  • Berenice (c. 267-221 BCE), the daughter of the Macedonian dynast Magas and his Seleucid wife Apame, was born in Cyrene, a Greek city in Libya. Ptolemy I had installed Magas, a son of his fourth wife Berenice I by a previous marriage, as governor of Cyrenaica (the northern coastal region of Libya). Magas eventually wrestled a measure of independence from Ptolemaic sovereignty but still had to acknowledge their suzerainty – and betrothed his daughter to the son and heir of Ptolemy II as a diplomatic and dynastic assurance. His half-Persian wife Apame was the daughter of Antiochus I and Stratonice.

    After his death (c. 252/1 BCE), Magas’ widow married Berenice to the Macedonian prince Demetrius the Fair – who, however, offended the soldiers of the Cyrenean army and was assassinated in the bedroom of Apame. Whether this capture in flagrante delicto was a plot set up by Berenice in tandem with her mother or not remains a mystery. Cyrene briefly attempted to establish a republic (c. 250/49-249/8 BCE). After this interlude in Cyrene, Berenice realigned with Egypt and renewed her marital pledges to Ptolemy III. After the natural death of Ptolemy II (c. Jan 246 BCE), his son succeeded to the throne, Berenice joined him in Alexandria, and they officially wed. He was 37; she had just turned 20. About half a year later the Seleucid king Antiochus II died with the succession unclear – his two rivaling queens Laodice and Berenice (sister of Ptolemy III) proclaiming their respective sons as heir to the throne. •

















    • (Article by Branko van Oppen || Photos belong to their respective owners)

  •  1,165  29  29 May, 2019