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Latest #firstamendment Posts

  • @indiewire's @katerbland calls Marion Stokes "a rabble-rouser, activist, and major intellect" in her review of @mattpwolf's "fascinating, weird, and often quite moving" documentary RECORDER: THE MARION STOKES PROJECT.

Opens this Friday at @MetrographNYC!
  • @indiewire's @katerbland calls Marion Stokes "a rabble-rouser, activist, and major intellect" in her review of @mattpwolf's "fascinating, weird, and often quite moving" documentary RECORDER: THE MARION STOKES PROJECT.

    Opens this Friday at @MetrographNYC!

  •  9  1  3 hours ago
  • @thejusticenewspaper thanks for letting me write for the forum. Quite possibly the most fun Iโ€™ve had in my entire educational experience. Opinions are of course mine. #firstamendment #writer #journalism it harkens back to my original desire to major in political science and pursue public office. Lots of things have happened between 18-51 itโ€™s a different form of #openmic you can do whatever tf you want donโ€™t let a friend or prof or the internet tell you you canโ€™t be or do something bc their view of you is too narrow.  You can love hair and fashion and makeup and shoes and still rail against corporate behemoths. You can be an mba candidate and still write songs about your black cat and do open mic. You can be a trained scientist and engineer and still search the bowels of the internet #likeaboss
  • @thejusticenewspaper thanks for letting me write for the forum. Quite possibly the most fun Iโ€™ve had in my entire educational experience. Opinions are of course mine. #firstamendment #writer #journalism it harkens back to my original desire to major in political science and pursue public office. Lots of things have happened between 18-51 itโ€™s a different form of #openmic you can do whatever tf you want donโ€™t let a friend or prof or the internet tell you you canโ€™t be or do something bc their view of you is too narrow. You can love hair and fashion and makeup and shoes and still rail against corporate behemoths. You can be an mba candidate and still write songs about your black cat and do open mic. You can be a trained scientist and engineer and still search the bowels of the internet #likeaboss

  •  4  1  11 hours ago
  • Who wins at advancing freedom of speech, vegan chili, third parties, and freedom of the press: the Reform Party or @govmikehuckabee Mike Huckabee?
  • Who wins at advancing freedom of speech, vegan chili, third parties, and freedom of the press: the Reform Party or @govmikehuckabee Mike Huckabee?

  •  5  1  13 hours ago
  • ๐Ÿ”ซ
  • ๐Ÿ”ซ

  •  14  2  16 hours ago
  • Submit your project or testimony of why youโ€™re thankful for your freedom to create and tag us and use the hashtag #CreateFreely for a chance to win a Google Home Mini! 
Giveaway ends Friday November 15th ๐Ÿค–โš™๏ธ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿป #csulb #csulbengineering #firstamendment
  • Submit your project or testimony of why youโ€™re thankful for your freedom to create and tag us and use the hashtag #CreateFreely for a chance to win a Google Home Mini!
    Giveaway ends Friday November 15th ๐Ÿค–โš™๏ธ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿป #csulb #csulbengineering #firstamendment

  •  13  0  17 hours ago
  • Itโ€™s about time that we elect an ethnic minority woman into office. #goldstomps
  • Itโ€™s about time that we elect an ethnic minority woman into office. #goldstomps

  •  10  1  20 hours ago
  • Freedom of Speech: Itโ€™s more than a legal concept.

Itโ€™s a bedrock principle that allows Americaโ€™s diverse 330 million citizens to coexist and flourish.

American universities once valued robust inquiry and intellectual debate that are the hallmark of free expression.

Sadly, today, those universities are in the midst of a free speech crisis.

College administrators routinely suppress speech that they regard as controversial. They do this through the use of free speech zones, โ€œbias response teams,โ€ and unequal treatment of speakers.

Some students have successfully sued their universities for First Amendment violations.

But those victories have done little to change the culture of censorship that permeates college campuses.

Until serious money is at risk, college and university administrators will continue to ignore pleas to protect speech on campus.

Itโ€™s time the federal government made funding of public higher education contingent upon honoring the First Amendment.
.
#nosafespaces #freespeech #firstamendment #1A #collegelife #instalaw #usconstitution #constitution #america #unitedstates
  • Freedom of Speech: Itโ€™s more than a legal concept.

    Itโ€™s a bedrock principle that allows Americaโ€™s diverse 330 million citizens to coexist and flourish.

    American universities once valued robust inquiry and intellectual debate that are the hallmark of free expression.

    Sadly, today, those universities are in the midst of a free speech crisis.

    College administrators routinely suppress speech that they regard as controversial. They do this through the use of free speech zones, โ€œbias response teams,โ€ and unequal treatment of speakers.

    Some students have successfully sued their universities for First Amendment violations.

    But those victories have done little to change the culture of censorship that permeates college campuses.

    Until serious money is at risk, college and university administrators will continue to ignore pleas to protect speech on campus.

    Itโ€™s time the federal government made funding of public higher education contingent upon honoring the First Amendment.
    .
    #nosafespaces #freespeech #firstamendment #1A #collegelife #instalaw #usconstitution #constitution #america #unitedstates

  •  24  1  12 November, 2019

Top #firstamendment Posts

  • Another AP Gov SCOTUS case. Definitely one of the most interesting cases in the course in my humble opinion. 
Schenck v United States (1919):
In June 1917, two months after the United States entered World War I, Congress passed the Espionage Act that made it illegal for Americans to take actions that would interfere with the war effort or obstruct recruitment. Still, many continued to protest against the war including socialists Charles Schenck Elizabeth Baer who distributed leaflets declaring the draft to violate the Thirteenth Amendment prohibition against involuntary servitude. Since the leaflets promoted peaceful public disobedience, Schenck was charged with conspiracy to violate the Espionage Act of 1917. While Schenck and Baer were convicted of violating the Espionage Act and sentenced to 10 years in prison, they appealed on the grounds that the act violated the First Amendment. Oral arguments began on January 9, 1919 and two months later the Supreme Court unanimously voted upholding the Espionage Act and Schenckโ€™s conviction. In the majority opinion, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. argued that the court owed greater deference to the government, even if constitutional rights were at stake. With the ruling, the Supreme Court established the โ€œclear and present danger testโ€ which does not protect speech if it puts the country in danger or presents danger that Congress can prevent. In his argument, Holmes famously compared the leaflets to falsely shouting โ€œFireโ€ in a crowded theatre, which is not protected under the First Amendment. After the end of World War I, the court abandoned the โ€œclear and present rulingโ€ in favor of an earlier โ€œbad tendency doctrine, which allowed speech to be limited even more broadly.
  • Another AP Gov SCOTUS case. Definitely one of the most interesting cases in the course in my humble opinion.
    Schenck v United States (1919):
    In June 1917, two months after the United States entered World War I, Congress passed the Espionage Act that made it illegal for Americans to take actions that would interfere with the war effort or obstruct recruitment. Still, many continued to protest against the war including socialists Charles Schenck Elizabeth Baer who distributed leaflets declaring the draft to violate the Thirteenth Amendment prohibition against involuntary servitude. Since the leaflets promoted peaceful public disobedience, Schenck was charged with conspiracy to violate the Espionage Act of 1917. While Schenck and Baer were convicted of violating the Espionage Act and sentenced to 10 years in prison, they appealed on the grounds that the act violated the First Amendment. Oral arguments began on January 9, 1919 and two months later the Supreme Court unanimously voted upholding the Espionage Act and Schenckโ€™s conviction. In the majority opinion, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. argued that the court owed greater deference to the government, even if constitutional rights were at stake. With the ruling, the Supreme Court established the โ€œclear and present danger testโ€ which does not protect speech if it puts the country in danger or presents danger that Congress can prevent. In his argument, Holmes famously compared the leaflets to falsely shouting โ€œFireโ€ in a crowded theatre, which is not protected under the First Amendment. After the end of World War I, the court abandoned the โ€œclear and present rulingโ€ in favor of an earlier โ€œbad tendency doctrine, which allowed speech to be limited even more broadly.

  •  2,873  26  3 October, 2019
  • Excerpt from Hefโ€™s scrapbook... Hef and his comicsโ€ฆ all forty-six volumes (this will make forty-seven).
He started it in 1943 as something to do during dull classes at Steinmetz High School. 
#ScrapbookSaturday
  • Excerpt from Hefโ€™s scrapbook... Hef and his comicsโ€ฆ all forty-six volumes (this will make forty-seven).
    He started it in 1943 as something to do during dull classes at Steinmetz High School.
    #ScrapbookSaturday

  •  3,074  57  9 November, 2019