#australiannatives Instagram Photos & Videos

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  • Folks, what you can see here is an experiment with 3 seed germination approaches and some amazingly clear results for a particular species  About a month ago I collected some Acacia saligna seeds and seperated them into three groups. Some plant species (Acacia, Senna, Hardenbergia) have seed structures or chemicals that delay and inhibit germination until conditions are favourable. Thus pre-treatment of seeds to remove these barriers can speed this process up.

The first group of seeds was the control - untouched and straight out of the seed pods.

The second group of seeds utilised an abrasion technique where I carefully removed part of the outer shell to allow moisture to penetrate inside.

Lastly the third group was heat treated with near boiling water then left over night. This treatment uses heat to crack the outer shell of each seed similar to the second group. IE: As fire would. This is a very common technique, and should work for a variety of species.

What you can see in the photos is three lines of seeds planted in a small container, left, middle and right - and only the second/middle abrasion group has germinated (with vigour too!). The heat treatment and the control are both still dormant.

#australiannatives #australianflowers #australiannativeplant #australiannativeplants #australiannativeflowers #australianflora #australiannative #australiangardens #floraofaustralia #nativegarden #nativeplants #nativelandscaping #nativeaustralianflowers
  • Folks, what you can see here is an experiment with 3 seed germination approaches and some amazingly clear results for a particular species  About a month ago I collected some Acacia saligna seeds and seperated them into three groups. Some plant species (Acacia, Senna, Hardenbergia) have seed structures or chemicals that delay and inhibit germination until conditions are favourable. Thus pre-treatment of seeds to remove these barriers can speed this process up.

    The first group of seeds was the control - untouched and straight out of the seed pods.

    The second group of seeds utilised an abrasion technique where I carefully removed part of the outer shell to allow moisture to penetrate inside.

    Lastly the third group was heat treated with near boiling water then left over night. This treatment uses heat to crack the outer shell of each seed similar to the second group. IE: As fire would. This is a very common technique, and should work for a variety of species.

    What you can see in the photos is three lines of seeds planted in a small container, left, middle and right - and only the second/middle abrasion group has germinated (with vigour too!). The heat treatment and the control are both still dormant.

    #australiannatives #australianflowers #australiannativeplant #australiannativeplants #australiannativeflowers #australianflora #australiannative #australiangardens #floraofaustralia #nativegarden #nativeplants #nativelandscaping #nativeaustralianflowers

  •  49  3  3 hours ago
  • All in the details of a muse.
  • All in the details of a muse.

  •  97  7  5 hours ago
  • FOR SALE - My piece “Leaf Litter” is up for sale! Hand embroidered on wool felt and stretched into a beautiful 5INCH oak hoop. $200 + shipping. Please message me if you’re interested ❤️
  • FOR SALE - My piece “Leaf Litter” is up for sale! Hand embroidered on wool felt and stretched into a beautiful 5INCH oak hoop. $200 + shipping. Please message me if you’re interested ❤️

  •  58  2  14 hours ago
  • Everyone, meet Party Pie. He is a grounded baby magpie learning his survival and flight skills who has found home in my backyard with this mummy and daddy Pies.  The parents are so good with us they leave him alone with me and the kids and they even bring him to us when we are sitting out in the sun. Love my magpies. #australiannatives #magpies #wildlife #australianbirdsofinstagram
  • Everyone, meet Party Pie. He is a grounded baby magpie learning his survival and flight skills who has found home in my backyard with this mummy and daddy Pies. The parents are so good with us they leave him alone with me and the kids and they even bring him to us when we are sitting out in the sun. Love my magpies. #australiannatives #magpies #wildlife #australianbirdsofinstagram

  •  6  0  16 hours ago
  • Gumnut babies 🐨🌿 These earrings are one of my favourite pieces. They represent home 🧡 Each component is handmade, textured & brought together by me, swipe to see detail up close. Available via the link in my bio & at the @youngstreetmakers twilight market this Friday night ✨
  • Gumnut babies 🐨🌿 These earrings are one of my favourite pieces. They represent home 🧡 Each component is handmade, textured & brought together by me, swipe to see detail up close. Available via the link in my bio & at the @youngstreetmakers twilight market this Friday night ✨

  •  120  11  16 hours ago
  • The Thick-leaved mallee (Eucalyptus pachyphylla), is native to inland Australia. Often found on sand dunes, it is an elegant Mallee with lanceolate shaped leaves and delicate creamy inflorescences.
  • The Thick-leaved mallee (Eucalyptus pachyphylla), is native to inland Australia. Often found on sand dunes, it is an elegant Mallee with lanceolate shaped leaves and delicate creamy inflorescences.

  •  25  1  16 hours ago
  • Details from 'A Portrait of Pally' 2019.

Sometimes the niggling doubts I have as a creative leave me questioning whether just drawing real life subjects/ creating works from nature that are (broadly speaking) quite realistic, is really enough?

There are so many interpretations of what art is. So many opinions in the art world. So many assumptions around what is 'good', 'challenging', 'unique' or 'important' art, and these (by no means difinitive) perceptions are always changing. Sometimes it feels like you have to be really crazy and fantastical or weird to have legitimate meaning.

But then I look at the disastrous events that our country is facing right now, and the events we have faced in the past, and the many natural atrocities people all over the world have been facing this year, and in recent years leading up to this point - and I do feel valid in showcasing the natural world as I see it.

I've always been in awe of the beauty of our flora and fauna, and always curious about the ways it subtly defines our understanding of place. The strangeness and the familiarity, the colours, textures, smells and shapes that are entangled in our memories, experiences and identity. These are the things that fascinate me, these connections and relationships with the world beyond ourselves (that we often only notice subconsciously) that really get me excited. And I'm always keenly aware that these subjects - and therefore our connections - can be so fleeting. So vulnerable and fragile. 
It's sad to think that perhaps my observations will one day be a documentation of what was. A memory of a place or a thing, rather than a reflection of what is around us.

I would hate it if that's what my work is reduced to (or perhaps elevated through greater weight of meaning) one day - but at least I feel more justified in painting flowers forever more 😉🌻 Hopefully the beauty and joy I share, also makes you reflective and aware, and if nothing else will help you educate your grandchildren on what we had (or ideally what we saved). This is partly what will be showcased in my exhibition next month as well. Details in previous post & my highlights.

Continued below 👇
  • Details from 'A Portrait of Pally' 2019.

    Sometimes the niggling doubts I have as a creative leave me questioning whether just drawing real life subjects/ creating works from nature that are (broadly speaking) quite realistic, is really enough?

    There are so many interpretations of what art is. So many opinions in the art world. So many assumptions around what is 'good', 'challenging', 'unique' or 'important' art, and these (by no means difinitive) perceptions are always changing. Sometimes it feels like you have to be really crazy and fantastical or weird to have legitimate meaning.

    But then I look at the disastrous events that our country is facing right now, and the events we have faced in the past, and the many natural atrocities people all over the world have been facing this year, and in recent years leading up to this point - and I do feel valid in showcasing the natural world as I see it.

    I've always been in awe of the beauty of our flora and fauna, and always curious about the ways it subtly defines our understanding of place. The strangeness and the familiarity, the colours, textures, smells and shapes that are entangled in our memories, experiences and identity. These are the things that fascinate me, these connections and relationships with the world beyond ourselves (that we often only notice subconsciously) that really get me excited. And I'm always keenly aware that these subjects - and therefore our connections - can be so fleeting. So vulnerable and fragile.
    It's sad to think that perhaps my observations will one day be a documentation of what was. A memory of a place or a thing, rather than a reflection of what is around us.

    I would hate it if that's what my work is reduced to (or perhaps elevated through greater weight of meaning) one day - but at least I feel more justified in painting flowers forever more 😉🌻 Hopefully the beauty and joy I share, also makes you reflective and aware, and if nothing else will help you educate your grandchildren on what we had (or ideally what we saved). This is partly what will be showcased in my exhibition next month as well. Details in previous post & my highlights.

    Continued below 👇

  •  41  2  17 hours ago
  • My new liddle sitting on Margaret Preston’s book. Margaret’s a kick ass Australian artist, now passed but revered by so many.
  • My new liddle sitting on Margaret Preston’s book. Margaret’s a kick ass Australian artist, now passed but revered by so many.

  •  998  31  18 hours ago
  • Shabby
  • Shabby

  •  21  3  20 hours ago
  • Thank you to @gina.kalabishis, who has sent in these beautiful photos of Coral Gum (Eucalyptus torquata) blooms! Indigenous only to a small area south of (and including) Kalgoorlie in Western Australia, the species has been planted across much of the continent in parks, gardens and as a street tree. With it's gorgeous pink buds and blooms and it's ornate, ribbed buds and fruit, it's no wonder the Coral Gum is one of the most widely planted eucalypts in Aus! Would you grow one at your place? #EucBeaut
  • Thank you to @gina.kalabishis, who has sent in these beautiful photos of Coral Gum (Eucalyptus torquata) blooms! Indigenous only to a small area south of (and including) Kalgoorlie in Western Australia, the species has been planted across much of the continent in parks, gardens and as a street tree. With it's gorgeous pink buds and blooms and it's ornate, ribbed buds and fruit, it's no wonder the Coral Gum is one of the most widely planted eucalypts in Aus! Would you grow one at your place? #EucBeaut

  •  270  9  21 hours ago
  • Today's work view 🌳⛰️
Back in time to smell the blooming roses and hike through eucalyptus forests #australiannatives
  • Today's work view 🌳⛰️
    Back in time to smell the blooming roses and hike through eucalyptus forests #australiannatives

  •  40  1  21 hours ago

Top #australiannatives Posts

  • She’s finished! Good luck and thank you to everyone who bought a raffle ticket @nurcha_bodymindearth this weekend at their World Vegan Day Festival! Looking forward to seeing who the new owner is...although kinda think she looks pretty happy where she is. Would it be wrong if I bought a ticket?! 🤔😂
  • She’s finished! Good luck and thank you to everyone who bought a raffle ticket @nurcha_bodymindearth this weekend at their World Vegan Day Festival! Looking forward to seeing who the new owner is...although kinda think she looks pretty happy where she is. Would it be wrong if I bought a ticket?! 🤔😂

  •  469  54  3 November, 2019
  • Thank you to @gina.kalabishis, who has sent in these beautiful photos of Coral Gum (Eucalyptus torquata) blooms! Indigenous only to a small area south of (and including) Kalgoorlie in Western Australia, the species has been planted across much of the continent in parks, gardens and as a street tree. With it's gorgeous pink buds and blooms and it's ornate, ribbed buds and fruit, it's no wonder the Coral Gum is one of the most widely planted eucalypts in Aus! Would you grow one at your place? #EucBeaut
  • Thank you to @gina.kalabishis, who has sent in these beautiful photos of Coral Gum (Eucalyptus torquata) blooms! Indigenous only to a small area south of (and including) Kalgoorlie in Western Australia, the species has been planted across much of the continent in parks, gardens and as a street tree. With it's gorgeous pink buds and blooms and it's ornate, ribbed buds and fruit, it's no wonder the Coral Gum is one of the most widely planted eucalypts in Aus! Would you grow one at your place? #EucBeaut

  •  270  9  21 hours ago
  • This is the bit I like most. Gotta work quick to blend and the palette is limited 💃💃💃
  • This is the bit I like most. Gotta work quick to blend and the palette is limited 💃💃💃

  •  2,189  47  29 October, 2019