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  • The fabric is the very 'it" here. If you are particularl about how a fabric should feel on your skin, get in here😊.
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No hype, this is the real deal💪
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A pair of classic leggings may just be what you need.
.
Available in sizes small to 4XL and in various colors.
  • The fabric is the very 'it" here. If you are particularl about how a fabric should feel on your skin, get in here😊.
    .
    No hype, this is the real deal💪
    .
    A pair of classic leggings may just be what you need.
    .
    Available in sizes small to 4XL and in various colors.
  •  0  1  1 minute ago

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  • T E R R I F I C
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How would you like to go to for that event this weekend. I'd love to go in this fierce cape sequin and ankara dress.....
*
*
You won't be looking over dressed or under dressed....It's just perfect *
*
You can style the cape in different ways...versatile is what we do *
*
Slide in to my DM now to order yours
  • T E R R I F I C
    _________________________________

    How would you like to go to for that event this weekend. I'd love to go in this fierce cape sequin and ankara dress.....
    *
    *
    You won't be looking over dressed or under dressed....It's just perfect *
    *
    You can style the cape in different ways...versatile is what we do *
    *
    Slide in to my DM now to order yours
  •  74  1  1 hour ago
  • “A contemporary African woman is one who is educated and presented with multiple choices. Based on her choices, she is able to make an educated decisions on how she wants to live her life.”📚 - Anonymous .
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Photo: @djamishere🧡
  • “A contemporary African woman is one who is educated and presented with multiple choices. Based on her choices, she is able to make an educated decisions on how she wants to live her life.”📚 - Anonymous .
    .
    .
    Photo: @djamishere🧡
  •  32  3  1 hour ago
  • My parents fled from Sudan in the late 80’s early 90’s due to civil war. They knew that if they stayed their children would have no opportunities, one that they felt was most important was the right to education. They fled to Egypt and shortly after I was born. .
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In Egypt they were denying (Southern) Sudanese children education, so their hope for freedom, peace and education was at a stand still. We protested for the right to education and the Southern Sudanese women were at the forefront of this movement.  My mother along with many other Southern Sudanese women protested in front of the UNHCR for two days in 1994. At that time I was 2 years old and I was too part of the movement. .
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Education has always been key! When we were privileged enough to come to the West, my parents kept it as a reminder that we are here for education and once we get our education we will go back and serve our people. .
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I’ve struggled, I’ve felt like quitting. I was reminded by educators that I was not an “A” student (uni prof) or that I shouldn’t even go into post secondary but rather into the workforce (high school guidance counsellor). I entertained this idea that I was incapable of success in education. But every time I tried to believe these perceptions of me I could not help but push even harder. I knew if I completed my Masters that I could go and complete my Doctorate. .
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I am proud to say that I have been offered admission to the school and program that I was hoping for and that this South Sudanese girl is about that life. Can’t nobody play with my education and everything I learn I will use to serve my people. .
.
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#southsudan #southsudanese #education #highereducation #refugeechild #power #motivation #unitednations #UNHCR #blackgirlmagic #blackpower #african #africanwoman #africaneducation #blackgirlsteach #blackeducator  #personaldevelopment #mystory #mystoryonmystory #youarepower
  • My parents fled from Sudan in the late 80’s early 90’s due to civil war. They knew that if they stayed their children would have no opportunities, one that they felt was most important was the right to education. They fled to Egypt and shortly after I was born. .
    .
    In Egypt they were denying (Southern) Sudanese children education, so their hope for freedom, peace and education was at a stand still. We protested for the right to education and the Southern Sudanese women were at the forefront of this movement. My mother along with many other Southern Sudanese women protested in front of the UNHCR for two days in 1994. At that time I was 2 years old and I was too part of the movement. .
    .
    Education has always been key! When we were privileged enough to come to the West, my parents kept it as a reminder that we are here for education and once we get our education we will go back and serve our people. .
    .
    I’ve struggled, I’ve felt like quitting. I was reminded by educators that I was not an “A” student (uni prof) or that I shouldn’t even go into post secondary but rather into the workforce (high school guidance counsellor). I entertained this idea that I was incapable of success in education. But every time I tried to believe these perceptions of me I could not help but push even harder. I knew if I completed my Masters that I could go and complete my Doctorate. .
    .
    I am proud to say that I have been offered admission to the school and program that I was hoping for and that this South Sudanese girl is about that life. Can’t nobody play with my education and everything I learn I will use to serve my people. .
    .
    .
    #southsudan #southsudanese #education #highereducation #refugeechild #power #motivation #unitednations #UNHCR #blackgirlmagic #blackpower #african #africanwoman #africaneducation #blackgirlsteach #blackeducator #personaldevelopment #mystory #mystoryonmystory #youarepower
  •  85  31  1 hour ago