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  • Tarzan 😈💯🔱
#ravana
  • Tarzan 😈💯🔱
    #ravana
  •  38  2  11 hours ago
  • මේරු මහා ඉදුකීර පරයන
රජත දාබිදු පඨවි පනනල
ධාරු සජ්ජිත කුලුණු ගුණබල
දියත දුරකල නිරිදු රාවණ
#රාවණ #ravana
  • මේරු මහා ඉදුකීර පරයන
    රජත දාබිදු පඨවි පනනල
    ධාරු සජ්ජිත කුලුණු ගුණබල
    දියත දුරකල නිරිදු රාවණ
    #රාවණ #ravana
  •  27  0  20 April, 2019
  • The present has misunderstood history.
#ravana
  • The present has misunderstood history.
    #ravana
  •  51  0  19 April, 2019
  • A new world is dawning where convoluted justifications will take the place of the simple sense of right and wrong.
.
Vanara – monkey men, derived from the word Vana Nara meaning ‘Man of forest’. Their lives mean nothing in a world where Devas and Asuras fight for dominance. They are a race of slaves, untouchables, discriminated by both Devas and Asuras. When brothers Baali and Sugreeva decide to bow no more and build a kingdom for their own people - Kishkinda is born. This is where the love triangle between Baali, Sugreeva and Tara unfold. It's interesting how one’s judgement is clouded by love – and not just romantic love
.
It’s insane how Anand Neelakantan blurs the line between hero and villain and gives us an encounter from the antagonist’s perspective. If Ravan’s flaw was his ego, I think Baali’s flaw was his blinded belief that we can live in a world where discrimination does not exist. Making these villains – tragic heroes
.
What really stood out for me in this book was Tara’s character. She is stuck in this love triangle and is torn by a sense of love, loyalty and the just the feeling of being wanted. I like her because she is not portrayed as a saint - but a normal woman with normal needs
.
One of my favourite lines is when Anand Neelakantan describes the ‘civilized society’ – if women were inaccessible, they were either to be shamed or revered like a Goddess. How true. I guess in many Tamil and Indian communities women are meant to act in a certain way, anything that doesn’t fit in those lines are not acceptable. Why is the concept of pride associated with the way the women-of-the-family dress, speak and behave? How did a community of people who thrived on equality and freedom reduce ourselves to value materialism and image?
.
If you don’t have plans this bank holiday weekend – have a read of Vanara! If you don’t know much about Baali and his role in Ramayana, Google him, he’s quite interesting and it will give you some context of Baali, Sugreeva and Hanuman. #vanara #anandneelakantan @itsanandneel #instabook #ramayana #indianmythology #bookstagram #readunderthecovers #ravana #ramsita #hanuman #baali
  • A new world is dawning where convoluted justifications will take the place of the simple sense of right and wrong.
    .
    Vanara – monkey men, derived from the word Vana Nara meaning ‘Man of forest’. Their lives mean nothing in a world where Devas and Asuras fight for dominance. They are a race of slaves, untouchables, discriminated by both Devas and Asuras. When brothers Baali and Sugreeva decide to bow no more and build a kingdom for their own people - Kishkinda is born. This is where the love triangle between Baali, Sugreeva and Tara unfold. It's interesting how one’s judgement is clouded by love – and not just romantic love
    .
    It’s insane how Anand Neelakantan blurs the line between hero and villain and gives us an encounter from the antagonist’s perspective. If Ravan’s flaw was his ego, I think Baali’s flaw was his blinded belief that we can live in a world where discrimination does not exist. Making these villains – tragic heroes
    .
    What really stood out for me in this book was Tara’s character. She is stuck in this love triangle and is torn by a sense of love, loyalty and the just the feeling of being wanted. I like her because she is not portrayed as a saint - but a normal woman with normal needs
    .
    One of my favourite lines is when Anand Neelakantan describes the ‘civilized society’ – if women were inaccessible, they were either to be shamed or revered like a Goddess. How true. I guess in many Tamil and Indian communities women are meant to act in a certain way, anything that doesn’t fit in those lines are not acceptable. Why is the concept of pride associated with the way the women-of-the-family dress, speak and behave? How did a community of people who thrived on equality and freedom reduce ourselves to value materialism and image?
    .
    If you don’t have plans this bank holiday weekend – have a read of Vanara! If you don’t know much about Baali and his role in Ramayana, Google him, he’s quite interesting and it will give you some context of Baali, Sugreeva and Hanuman. #vanara #anandneelakantan @itsanandneel #instabook #ramayana #indianmythology #bookstagram #readunderthecovers #ravana #ramsita #hanuman #baali
  •  49  3  19 April, 2019
  • One of the most common themes for the frescoes of Shekhawati is the Ramayan, one of Hinduism's great epics. Depicted here is the tale's antagonist, Ravan, perhaps Indian literature's most complexly layered character. Immensely learned and incredibly devout, Ravan turned villain through his abduction of Sita, the virtuous wife of divine king Ram of Ayodhya, at the behest of his scorn and jealous sister. He dies in the climactic battle of Lanka, defending his legion of demons against the monkey troops and celestial arsenal of Ram.
  • One of the most common themes for the frescoes of Shekhawati is the Ramayan, one of Hinduism's great epics. Depicted here is the tale's antagonist, Ravan, perhaps Indian literature's most complexly layered character. Immensely learned and incredibly devout, Ravan turned villain through his abduction of Sita, the virtuous wife of divine king Ram of Ayodhya, at the behest of his scorn and jealous sister. He dies in the climactic battle of Lanka, defending his legion of demons against the monkey troops and celestial arsenal of Ram.
  •  41  2  19 April, 2019