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#TurtukVillage #ladakh

India’s last major settlement northwards
The picturesque village of Turtuk is the last major settlement of India before the Line of Control beyond which lies Pakistan controlled Gilgit-Baltistan region. In fact, Turtuk was under Pakistan’s control until the 1971 Indo-Pak war where it came under Indian governance. Thus, correctly referred to as the ‘village divided by a border.’ Not just the name, the village itself is one of a kind.

A dying language still kept alive
The inhabitants of Turtuk speak a very interesting language known as Balti. It is a mix of Persian and old Tibetan. Though a considerable number of speakers across the border speak Balti, the language is finding fewer takers amongst the newer generations. Balti language uses old Tibetan sounds no longer used in modern Tibetan. So, ready to learn a new lingual?

A Beautiful Seclusion

The uniquely impressive geography of Turtuk is another reason for its seclusion from the outer world other than the government restrictions around the time of the war. Cushioned by the Karakoram mountains, the village is an extraordinary trek from the nearby villages like Hundar. The deserts, rocky roads and crabby mountains make it difficult for tourists to navigate. Exposed to this kind of extensive seclusion, Turtuk continues to be an untouched pearl in the northwestern region of Ladakh.

Mixed Culture

A Muslim village, in a Buddhist realm, within a Hindu-majority country -that’s Turtuk. The mixed ancestry shapes the culture of this village. Another factor of influence has been the opening of Turtuk to tourists from around the world. Here, you’re not just in India; well, technically you are; but practically, three countries- Pakistan, China and India altogether. The locals of Turtuk are more than happy to see tourists. Not only would this fetch you easy photographs but also help you bond with them which is like one of the best feelings in the world. Get ready to experience a whole offbeat landscape of beauty.

#india
#indian
#travel
#traveler
#tour
#camp
#love
#nature
#himalaya
#hill
#hillvillage
#village
#naturelove
#photoghraphy
#offbeatindia
#offbeatladakh
#offbeathill
#offbeatvillage
  • @travelerjockey Profile picture

    @travelerjockey

    Turtuk - Ladakh

    #P1
    #TurtukVillage #ladakh

    India’s last major settlement northwards
    The picturesque village of Turtuk is the last major settlement of India before the Line of Control beyond which lies Pakistan controlled Gilgit-Baltistan region. In fact, Turtuk was under Pakistan’s control until the 1971 Indo-Pak war where it came under Indian governance. Thus, correctly referred to as the ‘village divided by a border.’ Not just the name, the village itself is one of a kind.

    A dying language still kept alive
    The inhabitants of Turtuk speak a very interesting language known as Balti. It is a mix of Persian and old Tibetan. Though a considerable number of speakers across the border speak Balti, the language is finding fewer takers amongst the newer generations. Balti language uses old Tibetan sounds no longer used in modern Tibetan. So, ready to learn a new lingual?

    A Beautiful Seclusion

    The uniquely impressive geography of Turtuk is another reason for its seclusion from the outer world other than the government restrictions around the time of the war. Cushioned by the Karakoram mountains, the village is an extraordinary trek from the nearby villages like Hundar. The deserts, rocky roads and crabby mountains make it difficult for tourists to navigate. Exposed to this kind of extensive seclusion, Turtuk continues to be an untouched pearl in the northwestern region of Ladakh.

    Mixed Culture

    A Muslim village, in a Buddhist realm, within a Hindu-majority country -that’s Turtuk. The mixed ancestry shapes the culture of this village. Another factor of influence has been the opening of Turtuk to tourists from around the world. Here, you’re not just in India; well, technically you are; but practically, three countries- Pakistan, China and India altogether. The locals of Turtuk are more than happy to see tourists. Not only would this fetch you easy photographs but also help you bond with them which is like one of the best feelings in the world. Get ready to experience a whole offbeat landscape of beauty.

    #india
    #indian
    #travel
    #traveler
    #tour
    #camp
    #love
    #nature
    #himalaya
    #hill
    #hillvillage
    #village
    #naturelove
    #photoghraphy
    #offbeatindia
    #offbeatladakh
    #offbeathill
    #offbeatvillage

  •  8  0  1 hour ago
  • #P1
#TurtukVillage #Ladakh
5 reasons why you shouldn’t miss a chance to visit Turtuk Village:
India’s last major settlement northwards
The picturesque village of Turtuk is the last major settlement of India before the Line of Control beyond which lies Pakistan controlled Gilgit-Baltistan region. In fact, Turtuk was under Pakistan’s control until the 1971 Indo-Pak war where it came under Indian governance. Thus, correctly referred to as the ‘village divided by a border.’ Not just the name, the village itself is one of a kind.

A dying language still kept alive
The inhabitants of Turtuk speak a very interesting language known as Balti. It is a mix of Persian and old Tibetan. Though a considerable number of speakers across the border speak Balti, the language is finding fewer takers amongst the newer generations. Balti language uses old Tibetan sounds no longer used in modern Tibetan. So, ready to learn a new lingual?

A Beautiful Seclusion

The uniquely impressive geography of Turtuk is another reason for its seclusion from the outer world other than the government restrictions around the time of the war. Cushioned by the Karakoram mountains, the village is an extraordinary trek from the nearby villages like Hundar. The deserts, rocky roads and crabby mountains make it difficult for tourists to navigate. Exposed to this kind of extensive seclusion, Turtuk continues to be an untouched pearl in the northwestern region of Ladakh.

Mixed Culture

A Muslim village, in a Buddhist realm, within a Hindu-majority country -that’s Turtuk. The mixed ancestry shapes the culture of this village. Another factor of influence has been the opening of Turtuk to tourists from around the world. Here, you’re not just in India; well, technically you are; but practically, three countries- Pakistan, China and India altogether. The locals of Turtuk are more than happy to see tourists. Not only would this fetch you easy photographs but also help you bond with them which is like one of the best feelings in the world. Get ready to experience a whole offbeat landscape of beauty.

Apricot Hub

Turtuk village, apart from being the northernmost Indian village, is the largest apricot producing vil
  • @jitmustafi Profile picture

    @jitmustafi

    #P1
    #TurtukVillage #Ladakh
    5 reasons why you shouldn’t miss a chance to visit Turtuk Village:
    India’s last major settlement northwards
    The picturesque village of Turtuk is the last major settlement of India before the Line of Control beyond which lies Pakistan controlled Gilgit-Baltistan region. In fact, Turtuk was under Pakistan’s control until the 1971 Indo-Pak war where it came under Indian governance. Thus, correctly referred to as the ‘village divided by a border.’ Not just the name, the village itself is one of a kind.

    A dying language still kept alive
    The inhabitants of Turtuk speak a very interesting language known as Balti. It is a mix of Persian and old Tibetan. Though a considerable number of speakers across the border speak Balti, the language is finding fewer takers amongst the newer generations. Balti language uses old Tibetan sounds no longer used in modern Tibetan. So, ready to learn a new lingual?

    A Beautiful Seclusion

    The uniquely impressive geography of Turtuk is another reason for its seclusion from the outer world other than the government restrictions around the time of the war. Cushioned by the Karakoram mountains, the village is an extraordinary trek from the nearby villages like Hundar. The deserts, rocky roads and crabby mountains make it difficult for tourists to navigate. Exposed to this kind of extensive seclusion, Turtuk continues to be an untouched pearl in the northwestern region of Ladakh.

    Mixed Culture

    A Muslim village, in a Buddhist realm, within a Hindu-majority country -that’s Turtuk. The mixed ancestry shapes the culture of this village. Another factor of influence has been the opening of Turtuk to tourists from around the world. Here, you’re not just in India; well, technically you are; but practically, three countries- Pakistan, China and India altogether. The locals of Turtuk are more than happy to see tourists. Not only would this fetch you easy photographs but also help you bond with them which is like one of the best feelings in the world. Get ready to experience a whole offbeat landscape of beauty.

    Apricot Hub

    Turtuk village, apart from being the northernmost Indian village, is the largest apricot producing vil

  •  3  0  1 hour ago

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