#AssyrianIdentity Instagram Photos & Videos

AssyrianIdentity - 196 posts

Hashtag Popularity

0.5
average comments
39.7
average likes

Latest #AssyrianIdentity Posts

  • The theme of the 2019 ACSYA Annual General Meeting is heritage, culture, and identity. ACSYA’s vision is to develop strong relationships with government and non-government organisations— both regionally and internationally. The objective is to advocate for the conservation of Assyrian heritage sites that are of cultural and historical significance. Furthermore, the ACSYA Board of Directors recognises the importance of cultural transmission and sustainability, particularly among diaspora Assyrian communities who face significant challenges such as social/ demographic changes that reduce intergenerational contact. Access to resources relevant to indigenous Assyrian heritage, culture, and identity is crucial for present and future generations. Through consultation with a network of expert partners, ACSYA aims to develop educational programmes across a range of platforms (i.e. lectures, symposiums, training sessions, and workshops) relating to the Assyrian identity and our collective national narrative. The objective of these programmes is to conserve, transmit, and revive.

#Assyria, #Assyrian, #Assyrians, #Asor, #Asori, #Assur, #Assuraya, #Assuraye, #Ashur, #Ashuraya, #Ashuraye, #Othur, #Othuroyo, #Othuroye, #Athor, #Athoraya, #Athoraye, #Athur, #Athuraya, #Athuraye, #Athuri, #Aturi, #Ashuri, #Assuri, #Assyrien, #Assyrisch, #Assyrer, #Assyrisk, #AssyrianIdentity
  • The theme of the 2019 ACSYA Annual General Meeting is heritage, culture, and identity. ACSYA’s vision is to develop strong relationships with government and non-government organisations— both regionally and internationally. The objective is to advocate for the conservation of Assyrian heritage sites that are of cultural and historical significance. Furthermore, the ACSYA Board of Directors recognises the importance of cultural transmission and sustainability, particularly among diaspora Assyrian communities who face significant challenges such as social/ demographic changes that reduce intergenerational contact. Access to resources relevant to indigenous Assyrian heritage, culture, and identity is crucial for present and future generations. Through consultation with a network of expert partners, ACSYA aims to develop educational programmes across a range of platforms (i.e. lectures, symposiums, training sessions, and workshops) relating to the Assyrian identity and our collective national narrative. The objective of these programmes is to conserve, transmit, and revive.

    #Assyria, #Assyrian, #Assyrians, #Asor, #Asori, #Assur, #Assuraya, #Assuraye, #Ashur, #Ashuraya, #Ashuraye, #Othur, #Othuroyo, #Othuroye, #Athor, #Athoraya, #Athoraye, #Athur, #Athuraya, #Athuraye, #Athuri, #Aturi, #Ashuri, #Assuri, #Assyrien, #Assyrisch, #Assyrer, #Assyrisk, #AssyrianIdentity

  •  21  0  23 November, 2019
  • Historically, the name Syria[n] was derived from Assyria[n]. Archaeological evidence such as the Çineköy Inscription, an ancient monument (eighth-century BC) that was excavated in the village of Çine (30 km south of Adana, Turkey), attests to this. The monument features a bi-lingual Phoenician and Hieroglyphic Luwian inscription. In Phoenician, the toponym Assyria and the gentilic Assyrians are spelled as Ašur & Ašurīm, while its Luwian counterpart has Sura/i to cover both forms. Amid their contact with the Near East, particularly in the south Anatolian territories, classical Greeks therefore adopted the shortened form employed by the Luwians. By the Seleucid-Greek period, cultural and civic categories were imposed upon their subjects, one of which was the formation of a Syrian ethnos. Since Assyrians and other classical communities (i.e. Aramean tribes, west of the Euphrates River) by Seleucid rule are considered to have spoken the same language, Greeks increasingly categorised them as one and the same— Syrians. In his Histories, the fifth-century BC Greek historian Herodotus explains: "this people, whom the Greeks call Syrians [in reference to those east of the Euphrates River], are called Assyrians by the barbarians [non-Greeks]". Strabo, citing Posidonius of Apameia (mod. Hama Governorate, Syria.) stated that "the people we Greeks call Syrians (in reference to those west of the Euphrates) were called by the Syrians themselves Arameans." By contrast, the Assyrians were distinct from the Arameans in pre-Hellenistic times. The Greeks, nonetheless, complicated this distinction.

#Assyria, #Assyrian, #Assyrians, #Asor, #Asori, #Assur, #Assuraya, #Assuraye, #Ashur, #Ashuraya, #Ashuraye, #Othur, #Othuroyo, #Othuroye, #Athor, #Athoraya, #Athoraye, #Athur, #Athuraya, #Athuraye, #Athuri, #Aturi, #Ashuri, #Assuri, #Assyrien, #Assyrisch, #Assyrer, #Assyrisk, #AssyrianIdentity
  • Historically, the name Syria[n] was derived from Assyria[n]. Archaeological evidence such as the Çineköy Inscription, an ancient monument (eighth-century BC) that was excavated in the village of Çine (30 km south of Adana, Turkey), attests to this. The monument features a bi-lingual Phoenician and Hieroglyphic Luwian inscription. In Phoenician, the toponym Assyria and the gentilic Assyrians are spelled as Ašur & Ašurīm, while its Luwian counterpart has Sura/i to cover both forms. Amid their contact with the Near East, particularly in the south Anatolian territories, classical Greeks therefore adopted the shortened form employed by the Luwians. By the Seleucid-Greek period, cultural and civic categories were imposed upon their subjects, one of which was the formation of a Syrian ethnos. Since Assyrians and other classical communities (i.e. Aramean tribes, west of the Euphrates River) by Seleucid rule are considered to have spoken the same language, Greeks increasingly categorised them as one and the same— Syrians. In his Histories, the fifth-century BC Greek historian Herodotus explains: "this people, whom the Greeks call Syrians [in reference to those east of the Euphrates River], are called Assyrians by the barbarians [non-Greeks]". Strabo, citing Posidonius of Apameia (mod. Hama Governorate, Syria.) stated that "the people we Greeks call Syrians (in reference to those west of the Euphrates) were called by the Syrians themselves Arameans." By contrast, the Assyrians were distinct from the Arameans in pre-Hellenistic times. The Greeks, nonetheless, complicated this distinction.

    #Assyria, #Assyrian, #Assyrians, #Asor, #Asori, #Assur, #Assuraya, #Assuraye, #Ashur, #Ashuraya, #Ashuraye, #Othur, #Othuroyo, #Othuroye, #Athor, #Athoraya, #Athoraye, #Athur, #Athuraya, #Athuraye, #Athuri, #Aturi, #Ashuri, #Assuri, #Assyrien, #Assyrisch, #Assyrer, #Assyrisk, #AssyrianIdentity

  •  0  0  6 November, 2019
  • Portrait of the Assyrian noblewoman Sitti Maani Gioerida, c. 1626.

Pietro Della Valle was an aristocratic Italian author, traveller, linguist and composer who journeyed throughout the Orient and Levant during the Renaissance period. Della Valle is one of the most important, yet least known, Near Eastern travellers of the seventeenth-century. Whilst in Jerusalem, Della Valle laid eyes upon a portrait of an Eastern maiden by the name of Sitti Maani Gioerida, an ethnic Assyrian whose family originated from the city of Mardin. As per the records of Della Valle, it was in the city of Baghdad where he and Sitti Maani Gioerida are said to have married. Shortly after their marriage, the 23-year-old Assyrian noblewoman is said to have died and her corpse was transported to Rome in 1626. Pietro Della Valle deposited the remains of his deceased wife in his family vault located at the Basilica of Santa Maria in Ara Coeli. News reports from Rome to Florence explained “Pietro met Sitti Maani, the Assyrian noblewoman who was to become his wife, in Baghdad. She died within a few years of their nuptials, at the age of 23. Pietro had her body embalmed and carried it with him for the rest of his travels, eventually burying his wife in the Eternal City.” [1] In a poem dedicated to his late wife, Pietro Della Valle writes “I see, I see thee gliding by, with drooping lash, and raven curl, and mien of gentle dignity, though sweet Assyrian girl.” [2] [1] Sheila Barker, ‘Read All About It!’, The Medici Archive Project [website], (2016)<http://www.medici.org/read-all-about-it/>, accessed 02 Dec. 2016.
[2] The Asiatic Journal (London: Parbury, Allen & Co., 1832), 176.

#Assyria, #Assyrian, #Assyrians, #Asor, #Asori, #Assur, #Assuraya, #Assuraye, #Ashur, #Ashuraya, #Ashuraye, #Othur, #Othuroyo, #Othuroye, #Athor, #Athoraya, #Athoraye, #Athur, #Athuraya, #Athuraye, #Athuri, #Aturi, #Ashuri, #Assuri, #Assyrien, #Assyrisch, #Assyrer, #Assyrisk, #AssyrianIdentity
  • Portrait of the Assyrian noblewoman Sitti Maani Gioerida, c. 1626.

    Pietro Della Valle was an aristocratic Italian author, traveller, linguist and composer who journeyed throughout the Orient and Levant during the Renaissance period. Della Valle is one of the most important, yet least known, Near Eastern travellers of the seventeenth-century. Whilst in Jerusalem, Della Valle laid eyes upon a portrait of an Eastern maiden by the name of Sitti Maani Gioerida, an ethnic Assyrian whose family originated from the city of Mardin. As per the records of Della Valle, it was in the city of Baghdad where he and Sitti Maani Gioerida are said to have married. Shortly after their marriage, the 23-year-old Assyrian noblewoman is said to have died and her corpse was transported to Rome in 1626. Pietro Della Valle deposited the remains of his deceased wife in his family vault located at the Basilica of Santa Maria in Ara Coeli. News reports from Rome to Florence explained “Pietro met Sitti Maani, the Assyrian noblewoman who was to become his wife, in Baghdad. She died within a few years of their nuptials, at the age of 23. Pietro had her body embalmed and carried it with him for the rest of his travels, eventually burying his wife in the Eternal City.” [1] In a poem dedicated to his late wife, Pietro Della Valle writes “I see, I see thee gliding by, with drooping lash, and raven curl, and mien of gentle dignity, though sweet Assyrian girl.” [2] [1] Sheila Barker, ‘Read All About It!’, The Medici Archive Project [website], (2016), accessed 02 Dec. 2016.
    [2] The Asiatic Journal (London: Parbury, Allen & Co., 1832), 176.

    #Assyria, #Assyrian, #Assyrians, #Asor, #Asori, #Assur, #Assuraya, #Assuraye, #Ashur, #Ashuraya, #Ashuraye, #Othur, #Othuroyo, #Othuroye, #Athor, #Athoraya, #Athoraye, #Athur, #Athuraya, #Athuraye, #Athuri, #Aturi, #Ashuri, #Assuri, #Assyrien, #Assyrisch, #Assyrer, #Assyrisk, #AssyrianIdentity

  •  30  0  31 August, 2019

Top #AssyrianIdentity Posts

  • Museum London Assyrian Mespotamian Old History 4000 years 💮 @francoisreinke
  • Museum London Assyrian Mespotamian Old History 4000 years 💮 @francoisreinke

  •  26  1  30 April, 2019
  • [SNEAK PEAK] #Assyrian souvenirs to be sold exclusively by @acsyaorg early 2019 (Year of the Assyrian Identity)! Watch this space!
  • [SNEAK PEAK] #Assyrian souvenirs to be sold exclusively by @acsyaorg early 2019 (Year of the Assyrian Identity)! Watch this space!

  •  50  5  15 December, 2018