• National Geographic ( @natgeo ) Instagram Profile

    @natgeo

    13 August, 2019
  • Photo by Katie Orlinsky @katieorlinsky | Methane lake fire in Fairbanks, Alaska. I've been photographing in the Arctic for close to six years, trying to tell stories that put a human face on climate change. For nearly two of those years I've been working on “The Carbon Threat” for @natgeo, online today (link in my bio @katieorlinsky). The article, written by @craigwelch, tackles the urgent subject of permafrost thaw. It has been one of the most challenging stories I have ever photographed, a journey that fluctuated from frustrating and disturbing to fascinating and inspiring at a moment's notice. What is happening to our planet is not easy to swallow, but we must confront it head-on. I hope our article can help the public and policymakers recognize this new, groundbreaking reality and take action. Arctic permafrost is thawing much faster than expected, releasing carbon gases that could drastically speed up climate change. Scientists say what was once hundreds of years away could now happen in our lifetime, with permafrost thaw releasing nearly three times more greenhouse gases than expected. In this image, flammable methane, a potent greenhouse gas, bubbles from the thawing permafrost beneath a frozen lake. When you punch a hole through the ice, the gas escapes and can be measured—or set on fire— as a scientist demonstrates here. Permafrost refers to the layer of continuously frozen soil that covers almost 1/4th of the Earth’s surface, found mostly in the Arctic. Most permafrost areas have been frozen for more than 10,000 years. And trapped inside permafrost are carbon dioxide and methane gas, built up from thousands of years of decomposing organic matter. If the amount of CO2 trapped in the Earth’s permafrost was released, it would be two times the amount we currently have in the atmosphere. Meanwhile, methane is 25 times as potent as CO2, and if released could make today’s fossil fuel emissions look like chump change.
    Photo by Katie Orlinsky @katieorlinsky | Methane lake fire in Fairbanks, Alaska.
I've been photographing in the Arctic for close to six years, trying to tell stories that put a human face on climate change. For nearly two of those years I've been working on “The Carbon Threat” for @natgeo, online today (link in my bio @katieorlinsky). The article, written by @craigwelch, tackles the urgent subject of permafrost thaw. 
It has been one of the most challenging stories I have ever photographed, a journey that fluctuated from frustrating and disturbing to fascinating and inspiring at a moment's notice.  What is happening to our planet is not easy to swallow, but we must confront it head-on. I hope our article can help the public and policymakers recognize this new, groundbreaking reality and take action. 
Arctic permafrost is thawing much faster than expected, releasing carbon gases that could drastically speed up climate change. Scientists say what was once hundreds of years away could now happen in our lifetime, with permafrost thaw releasing nearly three times more greenhouse gases than expected. In this image, flammable methane, a potent greenhouse gas, bubbles from the thawing permafrost beneath a frozen lake. When you punch a hole through the ice, the gas escapes and can be measured—or set on fire— as a scientist demonstrates here.
Permafrost refers to the layer of continuously frozen soil that covers almost 1/4th of the Earth’s surface, found mostly in the Arctic. Most permafrost areas have been frozen for more than 10,000 years. And trapped inside permafrost are carbon dioxide and methane gas, built up from thousands of years of decomposing organic matter. If the amount of CO2 trapped in the Earth’s permafrost was released, it would be two times the amount we currently have in the atmosphere. Meanwhile, methane is 25 times as potent as CO2, and if released could make today’s fossil fuel emissions look like chump change.

    Photo by Katie Orlinsky @katieorlinsky | Methane lake fire in Fairbanks, Alaska.
    I've been photographing in the Arctic for close to six years, trying to tell stories that put a human face on climate change. For nearly two of those years I've been working on “The Carbon Threat” for @natgeo, online today (link in my bio @katieorlinsky). The article, written by @craigwelch, tackles the urgent subject of permafrost thaw.
    It has been one of the most challenging stories I have ever photographed, a journey that fluctuated from frustrating and disturbing to fascinating and inspiring at a moment's notice. What is happening to our planet is not easy to swallow, but we must confront it head-on. I hope our article can help the public and policymakers recognize this new, groundbreaking reality and take action.
    Arctic permafrost is thawing much faster than expected, releasing carbon gases that could drastically speed up climate change. Scientists say what was once hundreds of years away could now happen in our lifetime, with permafrost thaw releasing nearly three times more greenhouse gases than expected. In this image, flammable methane, a potent greenhouse gas, bubbles from the thawing permafrost beneath a frozen lake. When you punch a hole through the ice, the gas escapes and can be measured—or set on fire— as a scientist demonstrates here.
    Permafrost refers to the layer of continuously frozen soil that covers almost 1/4th of the Earth’s surface, found mostly in the Arctic. Most permafrost areas have been frozen for more than 10,000 years. And trapped inside permafrost are carbon dioxide and methane gas, built up from thousands of years of decomposing organic matter. If the amount of CO2 trapped in the Earth’s permafrost was released, it would be two times the amount we currently have in the atmosphere. Meanwhile, methane is 25 times as potent as CO2, and if released could make today’s fossil fuel emissions look like chump change.

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  • Torta Prestigio 
Para la torta:
1 taza de Leche
1 taza o 3 cucharadas soperas de Mantequilla sin sal
3 Huevos enteros
2 tazas de Harina
1 taza de Cacao
1 taza de Azúcar
1 cucharadita de Polvo para hornear
1 pizca de Bicarbonato de sodio

Preparación:
-Empieza tamizando los ingredientes secos (Harina, Cacao).
-En una licuadora o batidora bate los Huevos, la Leche, el Aceite o Margarina (pueden usar Aceite).
-Añade esta mezcla a los ingredientes secos y mezcla bien con una batidora eléctrica o una cuchara de madera.
-A continuación, añade el Polvo para hornear y Bicarbonato de sodio y mezcla bien.
-Lleva al horno precalentado durante unos 40 minutos. El tiempo puede variar dependiendo de cada horno

Para humedecer la torta:
400 ml de Leche.
6 cucharadas de Cacao

Para el relleno:
1 lata de Leche condensada
100 gramos de Coco rallado
1 cucharada de Margarina

Para la cobertura:
1 lata de Leche condensada
5 cucharadas de Chocolate
1 cucharada de Margarina
Cocinar en una olla hasta que se despegue del fondo

Montaje de la Torta:
-Con la Torta completamente fría, corta por la mitad con un cuchillo y humedece con la mezcla de Leche y Cacao.
-Luego, vierte el relleno y extiéndelo por toda la superficie.
-Coloca la otra mitad de la torta y el resto de la mezcla de Leche y Cacao, deja "remojar" la Torta.
-Finalmente, vierte la cobertuta (todavía caliente) y extiende por la parte superior y los lados.
-Decora con Coco rallado
Receta y foto de @dulcesrosaz
#dessert #food #desserts #foodporn #yum #yummy #foodforfoodies #foodpics #instafood #sweet #chocolate #cake #icecream #dessertporn #delish #foods #delicious #tasty #eat #eating #sweet #sweettooth #junkfood #nutella #instadessert #desserttable #cheesecake receta #cookies
  • @recetaadictiva Profile picture

    @recetaadictiva

    Torta Prestigio
    Para la torta:
    1 taza de Leche
    1 taza o 3 cucharadas soperas de Mantequilla sin sal
    3 Huevos enteros
    2 tazas de Harina
    1 taza de Cacao
    1 taza de Azúcar
    1 cucharadita de Polvo para hornear
    1 pizca de Bicarbonato de sodio

    Preparación:
    -Empieza tamizando los ingredientes secos (Harina, Cacao).
    -En una licuadora o batidora bate los Huevos, la Leche, el Aceite o Margarina (pueden usar Aceite).
    -Añade esta mezcla a los ingredientes secos y mezcla bien con una batidora eléctrica o una cuchara de madera.
    -A continuación, añade el Polvo para hornear y Bicarbonato de sodio y mezcla bien.
    -Lleva al horno precalentado durante unos 40 minutos. El tiempo puede variar dependiendo de cada horno

    Para humedecer la torta:
    400 ml de Leche.
    6 cucharadas de Cacao

    Para el relleno:
    1 lata de Leche condensada
    100 gramos de Coco rallado
    1 cucharada de Margarina

    Para la cobertura:
    1 lata de Leche condensada
    5 cucharadas de Chocolate
    1 cucharada de Margarina
    Cocinar en una olla hasta que se despegue del fondo

    Montaje de la Torta:
    -Con la Torta completamente fría, corta por la mitad con un cuchillo y humedece con la mezcla de Leche y Cacao.
    -Luego, vierte el relleno y extiéndelo por toda la superficie.
    -Coloca la otra mitad de la torta y el resto de la mezcla de Leche y Cacao, deja "remojar" la Torta.
    -Finalmente, vierte la cobertuta (todavía caliente) y extiende por la parte superior y los lados.
    -Decora con Coco rallado
    Receta y foto de @dulcesrosaz
    #dessert #food #desserts #foodporn #yum #yummy #foodforfoodies #foodpics #instafood #sweet #chocolate #cake #icecream #dessertporn #delish #foods #delicious #tasty #eat #eating #sweet #sweettooth #junkfood #nutella #instadessert #desserttable #cheesecake receta #cookies

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  • ★ 可愛い!❤️
★ instagram.com/oWiiWiio
★ facebook.com/oWiiWiio
  • @owiiwiio Profile picture

    @owiiwiio

    ★ 可愛い!❤️
    ★ instagram.com/oWiiWiio
    ★ facebook.com/oWiiWiio

  •  1,831  12  5 hours ago
  • Baked these pink & white raspberry macarons for a friend’s bridal shower today 💖💖
  • @macaronsbychristina Profile picture

    @macaronsbychristina

    Baked these pink & white raspberry macarons for a friend’s bridal shower today 💖💖

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